La Russa back, McGwire next?

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Updating a previous item, according to Buster Olney of, Tony La Russa has agreed to a new multi-year contract to manage the Cardinals.

This isn’t a tremendous surprise, but the possible newest addition to
his staff may raise a few eyebrows around the sport. According to
Olney, the Cardinals have fired hitting coach Hal McRae and the leading
candidate to replace him is former Cardinals slugger Mark McGwire.

McGwire has maintained a close relationship with La Russa over the years, but has been in baseball exile since appearing before a congressional hearing in 2005. McGwire hit 220 home runs in four and a half seasons with the Cardinals.

Unless McGwire finally addresses his alleged performance-enhancing drug
use, his presence could be an unnecessary distraction for a team that
is reeling from an early exit in the playoffs.

(5:40 pm ET) Update: Pat Lackey of AOL Fanhouse reports that the Cardinals have hired McGwire to replace McRae.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.