New Yankee Stadium already showing cracks

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It seems the Yankees’ new $1.5 billion city-subsidized stadium is beginning to show cracks,
just six months after its debut. The team has recently fallen under
scrutiny for cracks in the concrete pedestrian ramps — some as much as
an inch wide and several feet long — prompting the team to hire an
engineering company to determine whether the problems were caused by
the installation, the design, the concrete or other factors.

On the bright side, Alice McGillion, a team spokeswoman, called the cracks
“cosmetic,” saying that they pose no safety issues because they did
not affect the structural integrity of the ramps.

“There is no evidence that there is any issue or problem with concrete or any material in the building,” she said.

Interstate Industrial Corporation, the company that poured the
concrete, was banned from doing city work in 2004 because city
investigators
concluded it had ties to organized crime, an accusation its owners have
denied.

Interstate may sound familiar since they are currently front-and-center
in the trial of former Giuliani Police Commissioner Bernie Kerik. According to the Village Voice, Kerik is accused of accepting $165,000 in renovations on his Riverdale apartment from the
DiTomasso brothers — the principals of Interstate — in return for
recommending them for city contracts they were barred from.

As if that wasn’t bad enough, the company that evaluated the strength
of the concrete poured for the walkways, Testwell Laboratories, its
owners and several officers were indicted last year on state
racketeering charges. It’s unclear whether the team will have to tear
out any of the concrete in the ramps in question, however, according to
the New York Times, the problem could cost several million dollars to
fix.

The Blue Jays are allergic to .500

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The Blue Jays dropped Thursday afternoon’s game to the Rangers 11-4, splitting the four-game home series. And, impressively, the Blue Jays failed for the ninth time to get back to .500. The club is now 35-37.

Here’s a look at all the times the Blue Jays could’ve evened out their won-lost record and what happened:

  • April 5 (0-1): Lost 3-1 to the Orioles
  • April 7 (1-2): Lost 10-8 to the Rays
  • June 1 (26-27): Lost 12-2 to the Yankees
  • June 3 (27-28): Lost 7-0 to the Yankees
  • June 5 (28-29): Lost 5-3 to the Athletics
  • June 13 (31-32): Lost 8-1 to the Rays
  • June 16 (32-33): Lost 11-4 to the White Sox
  • June 20 (34-35): Lost 6-1 to the Rangers
  • June 22 (35-36): Lost 11-4 to the Rangers

The Blue Jays are now a half-game behind the Orioles for fifth place in the AL East, but they’re only 5.5 games behind the first-place Yankees. Interestingly, if the Blue Jays played in the NL East and had the same record, they would be in second place. But even the Phillies — baseball’s worst team — have been at .500 or better for a few days: after winning Opening Day and after game Nos. 6, 18, 19, 20, 21, and 22.

Report: Marlins expected to trade Adeiny Hechavarria

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Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports reports that the Marlins are expected to trade shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria in the next few days.

Hechavarria, 28, is currently on a rehab assignment for a strained left oblique. It’s the second time this season he’s hit the sidelines with an oblique injury. Hechavarria is also hitting a disappointing .277/.288/.385 over 67 plate appearances, which is marginally better than his career averages.

While the Marlins are shopping Hechavarria at depressed value, there are two factors that give him value: he still plays good defense, and he’s under team control through the 2018 season. Passan does estimate that Hechavarria will see a pay raise from $4.3 million this season to $6-7 million next season in his third and final year of arbitration eligibility.

Passan adds that while the Marlins aren’t yet willing to shop outfielders Christian Yelich and Marcell Ozuna, relievers A.J. Ramos, David Phelps, and Kyle Barraclough are being made available.