Why would any team want Mattingly for a manager?

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It’s long been assumed that he’d get the Dodgers’ job once Joe Torre retired, but Don Mattingly is in demand and apparently could jump ship now. He’s a leading candidate to take over for Eric Wedge in Cleveland and Jim Riggleman in Washington.
I just want to know why.
Mattingly’s reputation as a fine leader goes back to his playing days. There’s no doubt his teammates had great respect for him, and there was never any reason to question his status as one of the game’s gentleman.
Of course, that leadership never really translated on the field. Mattingly’s Yankees teams made the playoffs once in 14 seasons. That was in 1995, his final year of the bigs. Just a shell of his former self, he hit .288/.341/.413 with a mere 49 RBI in 128 games. He did end up turning in a big ALDS, going 10-for-24 with a homer and six RBI. However, the Yankees lost to the Mariners in a thrilling five-game series anyway. It was immediately after Mattingly retired that the Yankees went on their historic run.
Mattingly essentially took eight years off after his playing career, though he did serve as a spring training instructor with the Yankees. After the 2003 season, he took over as the Bombers’ hitting coach, serving in that role for three years. The Yankees then made him their bench coach, apparently with the idea of grooming him to replace Torre. However, after Torre was fired following the 2007 season, the Yankees picked Joe Girardi as their new manager.
Mattingly followed Torre to Los Angeles, but it was a bumpy ride at first. He was hired as the Dodgers’ hitting coach, but he abruptly stepped down in Jan. 2008, citing family issues, and took a lesser role. After six months, his family issues apparently cleared up, he made his interest known and took back to hitting coach job, replacing Mike Easler.
The family issues, though, have drawn more headlines than his on-field work of late. After Mattingly initially stepped down as hitting coach, his wife was arrested and charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct for refusing to leave Don’s property. Mattingly later got a protective order. In July of this year, his son Taylor was arrested for allegedly shoving his mother and spitting in her face. He was charged with battery by bodily waste and criminal mischief.
There’s not any evidence out there that Mattingly isn’t the man every Yankee fan who grew up in the 80s admired. Still, it’s hardly unfair to question his ability to manage a family. As for whether he can manage ballplayers, we simply have no idea, since Mattingly had no interest in working in the minors following his playing career. That remains the biggest strike against him. Mattingly has never had to handle a pitching staff, and he hasn’t exactly had the best role model in that area in Torre. His track record as a hitting coach is largely positive, but it’s quite possible that’s the best role for him.

Pete Mackanin doesn’t see the point in playing Tyler Goeddel

PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 20: Tyler Goeddel #2 of the Philadelphia Phillies hits a two-run home run in the first inning during a game against the Miami Marlins at Citizens Bank Park on July 20, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Hunter Martin/Getty Images)
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Phillies outfielder Tyler Goeddel was included in Wednesday’s starting lineup against the Nationals. It’s notable because it’s only his eighth start in August. The Phillies selected Goeddel from the Rays in the Rule 5 draft during the winter, which means the club has had to keep him on its 25-man roster all season. If the club didn’t, it would have had to offer Goddel back to the Rays.

Goeddel is by no means a top prospect, but the Phillies deemed him worthy enough of taking a year-long 25-man roster spot, which are quite valuable. And the rebuilding Phillies aren’t exactly fighting for a playoff spot, so why not play him?

As Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer reports, manager Pete Mackanin asked, “What’s the point?” in regards to starting Goeddel. Mackanin said, “I’ve seen enough of Goeddel to know. We’ve kept him this long and we’re going to keep him and we’ll see where we go next year with him. I don’t see a need to play him, especially after he hasn’t played so much.”

That seems like circular logic. You don’t see a need to play him because he hasn’t played much. Well, maybe if you played him more often, you’d see a reason?

In fairness, Goeddel hasn’t exactly torn the cover off the ball, putting up a .191/.250/.296 triple-slash line in 217 plate appearances. But the Phillies have chosen to play utilityman Cody Asche and journeyman Jimmy Paredes (“an extra player,” according to Mackanin), who both don’t figure to be in the Phillies’ future plans. Goeddel is only 23 years old. In May, when he was starting regularly, he posted a .794 OPS.

This isn’t a roster blunder on the Ruben Amaro, Jr. scale, but it’s a very odd way to handle a Rule-5 player for a rebuilding team.

Shelby Miller’s first start back in the majors wasn’t a disaster

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 31:  Shelby Miller #26 of the Arizona Diamondbacks pitches against the San Francisco Giants in the bottom of the second inning at AT&T Park on August 31, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
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Diamondbacks pitcher Shelby Miller returned to the majors on Wednesday after a stint of about a month and a half in the minor leagues. The right-hander had compiled an ugly 2-9 record and a 7.14 ERA over 14 big league starts along with a finger injury and the minor league demotion.

On Wednesday afternoon against the Giants at AT&T Park, Miller still got the loss, but he gave up only two runs on six hits and a walk with three strikeouts in three innings. It’s the fifth time in 15 starts he gave up two or fewer runs. Opposing starter Matt Moore, who nearly authored a no-hitter his last time out, was just a little bit better, limiting the D-Backs’ offense to a lone run in 5 1/3 innings. The Giants ultimately won 4-2.

You may recall Miller was part of the trade that forced the Diamondbacks to send Ender Inciarte, Aaron Blair, and 2015 No. 1 overall pick Dansby Swanson to the Braves. It’s a trade that chief baseball officer Tony La Russa defended as recently as last week.