MLB to changeup umpire assignments for the World Series

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Baseball has seen enough bad calls and is changing the way it assigns umpires for the World Series:

Stung by a rash of blown calls in the playoffs, Major League
Baseball is breaking tradition and sticking with only experienced
umpires for the World Series.

Longtime crew chiefs Joe West, Dana DeMuth and Gerry Davis, along
with Brian Gorman, Jeff Nelson and Mike Everitt will handle the games,
three people with knowledge of the decision told The Associated Press
this week . . . In 24 of the last 25 World Series, the six-man crew has included at
least one umpire working the event for the first time–baseball likes to
reward newer umpires, plus replenish the supply of umps with Series
experience.

Not that this is a guarantee of anything better than what we’ve seen. An experienced umpire does not necessarily make for a good umpire.  Joe West has been around forever, and for as long as he’s been around, people have complained about him. And he doesn’t take well to complaints: back in 1984 West actually ejected two SportsChannel cameramen when they allowed Mets players and coaches to see replays of a call he blew. And let us not forget that our friend Tim McClelland has been around for over 25 years, and he still made those awful calls at third base on Tuesday night.

But at least it’s something.  Not as good as, say, the limited introduction of replay or — an idea I heard someone suggest yesterday which may be better — simply stationing an umpire in the press box, giving him access to video and a headset and allowing him to serve as a overruling authority in the event something clearly gets blown on the field.

The Rangers release Josh Hamilton

ARLINGTON, TX - OCTOBER 4: Josh Hamilton #32 of the Texas Rangers reacts after scoring a run on a Elvis Andrus RBI double during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels at Globe Life Park on October 4, 2015 in Arlington, Texas. Texas won 9-2 and won the AL West Title. (Photo by Brandon Wade/Getty Images)
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Welp, it was probably worth the gamble given that the Angels were paying most of his salary. But the Rangers’ gamble on Josh Hamilton failed and now Josh Hamilton is a free agent. The club has given him unconditional release waivers.

Hamilton underwent surgery to repair lateral and meniscus cartilage in his left knee back in June. During surgery it was discovered that he had an ACL injury as well, which required reconstruction. This whole season was lost and, while Hamilton has one year remaining on his contract, the Rangers are clearly able to compete without him and could use the roster spot over the small chance that he could be an everyday player again.

Hamilton will earn $30 million next season, $26.41 million of which is being paid for by the Angels. Last year in 182 plate appearances with the Rangers, Hamilton hit .253/.291/.441 with eight home runs and 25 RBI. At age 35, it’s not hard to imagine that his major league career is effectively over.

 

The Yankees offer to pay for Doc Gooden’s rehab

FLUSHING, NY - UNDATED:  Dwight Gooden #16 of the New York Mets delivers a pitch during a game at Shea Stadium circa 1984-1994 in Flushing, New York.  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
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With the continuing caveat that it is really weird and likely as uncomfortable as hell for all of those involved for this to be playing out so publicly, here is the latest news on the Doc Gooden/Daryl Strawberry/possible cocaine relapse story. From the Daily News:

Dwight (Doc) Gooden is insisting publicly that he doesn’t have a drug problem, yet more and more people want to help him — none more significant than the Yankees, who have reached out to say they’ll pay for any treatment he would consider getting.

That’s admirable of the Yankees, as is their refusal to comment on it further (the Daily News got this info from Strawberry). The Yankees, of course, gave both Strawberry and Gooden second chances in the 1990s when their addiction problems threatened their careers.