No miracle coming for these Angels

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In truth, the ALCS should be over already. While there’s been just the one blowout, the Yankees have outshined the Halos in every aspect of the game through four long nights of baseball.
*The Bombers are hitting .278/.375/.481 with eight homers, while the Angels have struggled to a .201/.273/.329 line.
*The Yankees’ pitching staff has an exceptional 1.032 WHIP, while the Angels are at 1.661.
*With Mark Teixeira hauling in wide throws left and right, the Yankees have committed just three errors to the Angels’ six.
Maybe the baserunning goes to the Angels, if only by default. Both teams have been abysmal, but at least the Angels have been caught stealing just once, while the Yankees have been gunned down three times in five attempts.
The Angels didn’t even seem to make a real effort in Tuesday’s Game 4. Their at-bats are getting worse by the day.
Against CC Sabathia in Game 1, the Angels saw 3.94 pitches per plate appearance. Facing A.J. Burnett and a cast of relievers in Game 2, it was 3.97. In the Game 3 victory, though, it dropped to 3.70. In the Game 4 humiliation, they were all of the way down to 3.45.
For the Angels to win the series now, they’d need to beat A.J. Burnett, Andy Petttite and Sabathia in succession. They have a realistic chance of winning Game 5 with John Lackey on the mound, but it’s doubtful that Sabathia will work again until Game 1 of the World Series. The Yankee bullpen is fully rested after the completely unnecessary off day on Wednesday, and all of the extra time off has given Joe Girardi’s crew a big advantage at the end of games, even if Girardi doesn’t know how to optimize it. At this point, it’s just a matter of whether the Yankees will wrap it up in five or six.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.