Howard wins NLCS MVP after record-setting run

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Ryan Howard failed to drive in a run last night for the first time in this year’s playoffs, but it didn’t stop him from being named NLCS MVP after hitting .333/.524/.933 with two homers and eight RBIs in the Phillies’ five-game series win over the Dodgers.
Howard’s streak of consecutive playoff games with an RBI was snapped at eight, which ties him with Lou Gehrig and Alex Rodriguez for the all-time record (pending what A-Rod does tonight).
He also joins the following list of this decade’s NLCS MVP winners:
2009 – Ryan Howard
2008 – Cole Hamels
2007 – Matt Holliday
2006 – Jeff Suppan
2005 – Roy Oswalt
2004 – Albert Pujols
2003 – Ivan Rodriguez
2002 – Benito Santiago
2001 – Craig Counsell
2000 – Mike Hampton
Lots of big names on that list, with the occasional Suppan or Counsell thrown in as a reminder of how unpredictable the playoffs can be. Philadelphia is the first NL team to play in back-to-back World Series since Atlanta in 1995 and 1996, and the NLCS MVPs those two years were Javy Lopez and … Mike Devereaux.

Must-Click Link: The Day a Mascot Got Ejected

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Today Jonah Keri gives us a fantastic story about a crazy game.

The Dodgers played the Expos in Montreal 28 years ago today. The game went 22 innings. It was a 1-0 game. More notable than the 21 and a half innings of scoreless ball, however, was the fact that Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda got the Expos mascot — Youppi — ejected. The Dodgers and Expos didn’t score much that year overall, but when have you ever seen a mascot ejected?

Some good lunchtime reading for y’all, complete with silly GIFs and a video of the whole dang game if you hate yourself so much that you’d watch it all in its entirety.

Nicholas Castellanos hit an inside-the-park homer that shouldn’t have been

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Last night the Yankees pasted the Tigers in Detroit, but the hometown crowd did get something entertaining to send them on their way: an inside-the-park homer from Nicholas Castellanos.

At least that’s technically what it was. It would be a single and a three-base error if our official scoring made any sense.

Watch the play below. It’s all put in motion by Jacoby Ellsbury‘s decision to try to make a slide catch on the ball, misjudging it and allowing it to skip over 100 feet to the wall:

Since Ellsbury didn’t touch it it wasn’t called an error — errors are rarely if ever called on poor plays that don’t result in a fielder actually touching the ball — but it was certainly a mental error to not let the ball bounce and ensure that it didn’t get past him. Especially with such a big lead.

Oh well, that’s baseball for you.