Diamondbacks get lucky: Reynolds misses arbitration cutoff

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As we noted back in July, it was sure to go right down to the wire. As it turned out, Mark Reynolds’ two years and 138 days of service time wasn’t quite enough to make him a “super-two” arbitration eligible player. This year’s cutoff was two years, 141 days.
Under the rules of MLB, players with between three and six years of service time, as well as the top one-sixth of players with between two and three years, qualify for arbitration after every season. Those top one-sixth are known as “super-two” players, and that one rule is why we’ve seen teams so cautious about promoting prospects in April and early May during recent years.
Reynolds was called up from the majors on May 16, 2007, never to be sent down. Had the Diamondbacks chosen to promote him on May 13 instead, he’d likely be in line to earn at least $5 million next year. As is, Arizona could pay him as little as $500,000 or maybe up to $800,000 or so if the team is feeling generous.
Tim Lincecum, on the other hand, was called up on May 6, 2007, never to be sent down. Those extra seven days spent on the roster of a team that ended up finishing in last place will cost the Giants dearly. Lincecum figures to ask for something in the neighborhood of the $10 million Ryan Howard requested and received as a super-two player after 2007. Not only are the Giants going to spend $9 million more than they needed to on Lincecum next year, but that huge increase will continue to be reflected in future arbitration years and keep costing them down the road.
So, yeah, the Giants made a huge mistake. The Diamondbacks, though, weren’t nearly as sure what they had in Reynolds when a Chad Tracy injury led to his callup. They caught a big break in that they won’t have to pay for Reynolds’ ample production for another year. The $5 million that they might have spent on him can now go towards improving the rotation or the bullpen or for an upgrade at second base.

Former major league pitcher Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez dies in traffic accident

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Former Phillies right-hander Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez died in a traffic accident in Havana on Thursday, per reports from the El Nuevo Herald and CiberCuba. No other deaths or injuries have been reported in connection to the accident. Gonzalez was 34 years old.

The Cuban righty defected from his home country in 2013 and signed a three-year, $12 million contract with the Phillies. A bout of right shoulder tendinitis compromised his bid for a major league role, but he finally broke through to the big leagues at the tail end of the 2014 season and turned in a 6.75 ERA, 5.1 BB/9 and 8.4 SO/9 in just six outings. Another case of shoulder inflammation derailed any progress he might have made in 2015, however, and he recorded just five innings in Triple-A Lehigh Valley before the team officially released him prior to the 2016 season.

The Phillies released a statement following news of Gonzalez’s death: