Kenji Johjima surprisingly opts out of Mariners contract, returns to Japan

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Kenji Johjima had two years and $16 million remaining on the contract extension that Bill Bavasi misguidedly handed out as one of his final acts as Mariners general manager, but the 33-year-old catcher has decided to accept an undisclosed buyout from the team and finish his career in Japan.
According to Larry LaRue of the Tacoma News Tribune, Johjima’s interest in returning home increased when the Mariners informed him that he’d likely be a backup in 2010 after hitting just .247/.296/.406 this season and .227/.277/.332 last year.
Here’s what Johjima said about the decision to resume playing in Japan after four seasons in Seattle:

After lots of very deep thought and deliberation, I have decided to return home to resume my career in Japan. I have had a wonderful experience competing at the Major League level. The last four years have been extraordinary, with great teammates and great coaches.



I will always be indebted to the Mariners organization for giving me the opportunity to follow my dream. This was a very difficult decision, both professionally and personally. I feel now is the time to go home, while I still can perform at a very high level. Playing close to family and friends was a major factor. I will miss the Seattle fans and their gracious support.

Johjima’s big-league career began with back-to-back strong seasons, but his decline since then has been significant enough that he’s no longer a starting-caliber backstop, let alone one worth $8 million per year. Assuming that the undisclosed buyout amount isn’t more than a fraction of the $16 million Johjima is owed, the Mariners stand to benefit quite a bit from his decision.
Rob Johnson replaces Johjima atop the catching depth chart for now, but 25-year-old prospect Adam Moore is just about MLB-ready after hitting .309/.391/.489 at Double-A and .294/.346/.429 at Triple-A. Transitioning to Moore as the starter behind the plate with Johnson as his veteran backup figures to be no less productive than Johjima even without factoring in the millions saved.

Video: Adrian Beltre and Carlos Beltran give signs from the dugout

OAKLAND, CA - SEPTEMBER 23:  Adrian Beltre #29 of the Texas Rangers stands in the dugout before their game against the Oakland Athletics at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum on September 23, 2016 in Oakland, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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The Rangers got a bit of a breather on Saturday after clinching the division lead during Friday night’s win. Naturally, it was also a prime opportunity for another of Adrian Beltre‘s well-documented antics, as he spent his off day directing the Rangers’ infield defense with a series of signs. Even with Carlos Beltran‘s help, no one, least of all those playing the infield, appeared to have any idea what Beltre’s gestures were intended to convey.

You can add this to the list of in-game oddities Beltre has become so well-known for over the years, running the gamut from the way he kicked a ball over the foul line to his histrionics every time someone comes close to touching his head. If nothing else, it’s a convincing audition reel for the third baseman’s future in major league coaching — a career path that, I’d imagine, would end up looking something like this:

Yordano Ventura exits game with back tightness

DETROIT, MI - SEPTEMBER 24: Yordano Ventura #30 of the Kansas City Royals pitches against the Detroit Tigers during the first inning at Comerica Park on September 24, 2016 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)
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Royals’ right-hander Yordano Ventura was pulled in the fifth inning of Saturday’s matinee against the Tigers with an apparent injury. After throwing four pitches to start the fifth and serving up a Justin Upton double, Ventura was visited on the mound by head trainer Nick Kenney. Per Rustin Dodd of the Kansas City Star, he’s day-to-day with back spasms and lower back tightness.

It’s just another bump in the road for the defending champions, who currently sit 6.5 games back of a postseason spot with seven left to play. Through 176 innings in 2016, Ventura posted a 4.35 ERA and 1.2 fWAR, a considerable downgrade from the 4.08 ERA and 2.7 fWAR he contributed during last season’s championship year despite a moderate bounce-back in the second half.

Prior to his early exit from Saturday’s game, Ventura went four innings for the Royals, giving up three runs on 10 hits and two walks and striking out six of 24 batters faced.