The Dodgers' owners are splitting up

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This is the sort of thing that can cause a team serious trouble:

Dodgers owner Frank McCourt and his wife Jamie, the team’s chief executive, have separated, raising questions about the potential effect of their rift on the ownership of the franchise as the Dodgers prepare to start the National League Championship Series against the Philadelphia Phillies today at Dodger Stadium.

“This is a personal matter and they request that their privacy be respected. They will be making no public statements,” they said in a release issued by the club late Wednesday.

Trouble, because when a divorcing couple owns an asset valued at $722 million, in a community property state like California, there are two options: (1) one of the owners buys out the other’s share; or (2) they sell the asset and split the proceeds.

According to the article, major league officials do not believe either spouse could afford to buy out the other and still maintain a financial reserve sufficient to run the club without taking on financial partners. Sure, there is a reference in the article to the possibility of a prenup, which could short-circuit all of this, but it’s not like the McCourts were married yesterday.  They got married in 1979, and back then Frank McCourt was merely the owner of a two year-old parking lot development company. In light of that, it strains credulity that there’s a prenup in place that covers the hundreds of millions of dollars the McCourt family has earned over the past three decades, especially given the fact that Jamie McCourt — the Dodgers’ current CEO — appears to have played a much more active role in Frank McCourt’s businesses than most spouses do. And even if it arguably does, a court’s skepticism and disregard for a given prenup increase the longer a given marriage lasted.  Thirty years is a long time as far as these things go. Any prenup the McCourt’s have could conceivably be ignored.

We saw this dynamic play out in San Diego over the past year, where Padres’ owner John Moores — rich, but not in possession of all the much in the way of liquid assets — had to slash payroll and then enter into some farkakte, slow-motion sale of the team to Jeff Moorad.  It’s a situation that will, in all likelihood, serve to hamstring the Padres for several years.  Will such a thing happen in L.A.?  Frank McCourt’s lawyer is quoted in the article saying no, but then again, he’s Frank McCourt’s lawyer so he’s going to say stuff like that.  The fact of the matter is that given Jamie McCourt’s job with the team, the breakup will no doubt will cause some level of disruption even if the financial repercussions are somehow sorted out, and like I said, the chance of that happening with no drama is pretty low.

The biggest question arising all of this, however, is why the McCourts are announcing this now (this came via a Dodgers’ official statement).  The team starts the NLCS tonight and you’d think that the owners would want nothing short of 100% positive juju right now.  One possibility?  They’re just bad at P.R.  A more plausible possibility: some reporter was about to break the news on this in a way the McCourts don’t like — say, with some unflattering or even ugly details — and they wanted to get out in front of it.

Either way, this is shaping up to be a pretty damn momentous week in Dodgerland.

Video: Andrew Toles hammers grand slam in Cactus League win

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Dodgers’ left fielder Andrew Toles crushed his first spring training home run on Saturday afternoon. With the bases loaded and a two-run deficit hanging over their heads in the fourth inning, Toles stepped up to the plate against Oakland right-hander Jesse Hahn and unloaded a grand slam on the second pitch he saw.

Third baseman Justin Turner was quick to follow up with a solo jack of his own, bringing the score to a comfortable 7-4 lead by the end of the fourth. Another three-run outburst in the fifth and an eighth-inning RBI single by Austin Barnes raised the final score to 11-6… which, coincidentally, was the same score the Reds used to defeat the Athletics’ second split-squad lineup on Saturday (albeit with a few more RBI walks than grand slams).

Toles, 24, is approaching his sophomore season with the Dodgers in 2017. He slashed .314/.365/.505 with three home runs and an .870 OPS in his first major league season in 2016 and is expected to platoon with the right-handed Franklin Gutierrez in left field this year.

David Price’s season debut could be pushed back to May

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David Price showed “strength improvements” in his elbow on Saturday, but Red Sox’ manager John Farrell still doesn’t think the left-hander will be ready to throw by the start of the season — or for a few weeks afterward. According to ESPN’s Scott Lauber, the 31-year-old might not be ready to debut until May at the earliest.

Price hasn’t thrown off of a mound this spring after experiencing soreness in his left elbow on March 1. Surgery doesn’t appear to be necessary, but the Red Sox are playing it extra safe with their No. 3 starter in hopes that rest and rehabilitation will return him to full health sometime during the 2017 season. For now, Price has been restricted to short games of catch until he’s cleared to resume a more rigorous throwing program. Via MLB.com’s Ian Browne:

[There were] strength improvements to the point of putting the ball back in his hand a little more consistently,” said manager John Farrell. “Today’s the first step for that. A short game of catch. That’s what he’s going through. Not off a mound but just to get the arm moving with a ball in flight, and he will continue in this phase for a period of time. There’s no set distance and volume yet to the throws.

The lefty is coming off of a lackluster 2016 season, during which he delivered a 3.99 ERA, 2.0 BB/9 and 8.9 SO/9 over 230 innings for the Red Sox.