Wagner talks retirement, but agent doesn't buy it

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Billy Wagner hinted yesterday that he’s leaning toward retirement, saying “I don’t plan on talking to nobody” when asked where he’ll pitch next season.
Wagner was dominant after coming back from Tommy John elbow surgery, posting a 1.72 ERA, 26/8 K/BB ratio, and .154 opponents’ batting average in 15.2 innings, but gave up two runs in Game 3 of the ALDS as the Red Sox were swept out of the playoffs.
As part of the trade that sent Wagner from New York to Boston the Red Sox agreed not to exercise his $8.8 million option for next season, with the assumption being that he wanted to pursue closing elsewhere. Wagner is just 15 saves from reaching 400 for his career, which is a mark topped by only Trevor Hoffman, Mariano Rivera, Lee Smith, and John Franco.
Wagner called the 400-save milestone “just dust in the wind” yesterday, but Mike Puma of the New York Post quotes “a source close to the situation” as saying that he “might just need a cooling period before deciding to pitch in 2010.” That seemingly makes more sense than battling all the way back from Tommy John surgery to reestablish himself as an elite reliever only to call it quits 15 innings later.
Wagner’s awesomely named agent, Bean Stringfellow, seems to think that he’ll be pitching in 2010, saying the following to the Boston Herald this morning:

Those comments probably came right after the Red Sox lost, so I’d bet they were said in the heat of the moment, when he was very frustrated. That’s probably not the best time to take comments like that as gospel. That’s not what Billy has told me or indicated to me about next year. That’s not to say that he couldn’t, but he’s given me no indication that he will retire. Certainly I am moving towards him playing next year.

Wagner is a Type A free agent, so retiring rather than signing elsewhere would cost the Red Sox a pair of compensatory draft picks. And more importantly the best left-handed reliever of all time showed that he has plenty of gas left in the tank at the age of 37.

Miguel Montero to be designated for assignment

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A play in three acts:

I.

Miguel Montero talks smack about his teammate

II.

A team leader talks smack about Miguel Montero

III.

The Cubs get rid of Miguel Montero:

This is rather surprising. As I said in the last post, I figured he’d apologize today and it’d all be in the past. Guess not. Even more surprising: we learned earlier this week that the key to good clubhouse chemistry is having a teammate everyone hates. Guess that only works for the Giants.

Montero is making $14 million this season, so the Cubs are definitely eating some money to make a headache go away. They’re also losing some offensive production, as Montero has hit a nice .286/.366/.439 on the season. His terrible defense against opposing baserunners mitigates that, of course. And the whole “pissing off everyone in the clubhouse” thing isn’t exactly working out for him either, so here we are.

Oh well, have a good one, Miguel.

We now have photographic proof that Tom Ricketts and Ted Cruz are different people

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A lot of people think they have a double walking around someplace on Earth. They may actually be right. We have an example of this in baseball and politics.

Cubs owner Tom Ricketts looks a lot like Texas senator Ted Cruz. Or, since Ricketts is older, I guess Cruz looks like Ricketts. Either way, they could play brothers if someone put on, like, the worst ever production of some play about brothers.

If you’re not familiar with one or both of those guys, take a gander at the photo that was taken of the two of them in Washington this morning as the Cubs made the rounds with their World Series trophy:

If they put those rings together, Tom can turn into any animal and Ted can turn into anything made out of water. True story.