The heroic struggle of Ed Hearn

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Folks my age and older might remember Ed Hearn, if not for his role as a dependable backup catcher for the 1986 Mets than at least for his presence in the trade that sent him to Kansas City in exchange for one David Cone.  That resume may be the sort of thing that keeps a guy in free lunches and attaboys during his retirement, but for Ed Hearn, baseball is but a tiny footnote in his life story:

As the baseball postseason unfolds this month, heroes will be
anointed, and star players feted. Nobody will say a word about Hearn,
who isn’t the best ballplayer to play in this city, but may be the most
courageous, and the most selfless.

At 49, Hearn has been through three kidney transplants, 25
surgeries, three dozen carcinomas and courses of radiation. He takes 20
medications a day, running his lifetime pill total to about 140,000.
When he was first diagnosed in the early 1990s, he was so distraught
that he went down to the basement with a loaded gun, and wrote a
suicide note to his wife, Trish.

Now he says it is his love for Trish, and their son, Cody, and his faith, that keeps him going.

Harrowing stuff indeed, turned uplifting by Hearn’s courage and equanimity in the face of something that would make even the strongest among us wilt.  If nothing else, it’s a story that truly puts baseball in perspective.

Sean Manaea has a no-hitter through eight innings

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UPDATE (11:06 PM ET): Manaea is through eight innings of his no-hitter. He caught Rafael Devers looking, then induced a pop-up to retire Sandy Leon and whiffed Jackie Bradley Jr. to end the inning. He’s at 95 pitches and a career-high 10 strikeouts entering the ninth.

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea has no-hit the Red Sox through seven innings of Saturday’s game. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea held the Sox to just three total baserunners through the first seven innings.

Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning, collecting an infield hit for what appeared to be the Red Sox’ first hit of the evening. Upon further review, however, the hit was reversed after Benintendi incurred a batter interference call for running outside the baseline.

Manaea is currently working with a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth. He’s racked up eight strikeouts against 23 batters so far.

If Manaea sees the no-hitter through to completion — as seems entirely possible, given that his pitch count is resting at 84 entering the eighth — he’ll be the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter, meanwhile, was back in 1993 against the Mariners’ Chris Bosio.