Phillies brave the cold, benefit from another blown call, to take a 2-1 lead

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The game story calls Brad Lidge’s save “sweet redemption” but it’s not like it was a shutdown affair. He had shaky control and put two runners on before sealing the deal.  That’s good — certainly better than he had been doing — but let’s not go pretending it’s 2008 again yet, OK?

And what would a 2009 postseason game be without yet another blown call? Because a lot of you
were probably asleep for it, here’s how it went down: Ninth inning,
game tied, Rollins singles, moves to second on a Victorino sacrifice,
moves to third on Chase Utley’s infield hit, and then scores the
winning run on a Ryan Howard sacrifice fly. Except Utley’s hit
shouldn’t have been a hit, because it bounced up and hit him on the leg
in the batter’s box. Home plate umpire Jerry Meals didn’t call the ball
dead. Meals admitted after the game that he blew it, blaming a tough
angle — which is true — and the fact that Utley didn’t react: “Chase
Utley took off like it was nothing,” Meals added. “He gave no
indication to us that it hit him. Whatever percent of the time, you’re
going to get a guy that’s going to stop if it hits him.” I guess
“whatever percent of the time” criminals turn themselves in for their
crimes too, but I don’t think we should base law enforcement strategy
on it.

All of that stuff aside, I’m kind of pulling for the Phillies in this series because (a) they’re
a more interesting team to watch than the Rockies in my personal opinion; and (b) I really don’t want to see
more winter ball like we’ve had in Colorado over the weekend. That said, if the Phillies take care of business
today, we’ll have two nights with no baseball, which is a bad thing.

So let’s go Rockies
today, and let’s go Phillies tomorrow!

Phillies, Red Sox interested in Carlos Santana

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The Phillies and Red Sox appear intent on pursuing free agent first baseman Carlos Santana, MLB Network’s Jon Morosi reports. Santana rejected a one-year, $17.4 million qualifying offer from the Indians on Thursday and is expected to draw widespread interest on the market this winter. The Mets, Mariners, Angels and Indians could make a play for the infielder, though no serious offers have been made this early in the offseason.

Santana, 31, is coming off of a seven-year track with the Indians. He batted .259/.363/.455 with 23 home runs and 3.0 fWAR last season, making 2017 the fourth-most valuable year of his career to date. Although he was primarily stationed at first base over the last year, he could step back into a hybrid first base/DH role with the Red Sox, who are hurting for infield depth with Hanley Ramirez still working his way back from shoulder surgery.

As for Santana’s other suitors, the Mariners are far less likely to pursue a deal after trading for Ryon Healy last Wednesday. Neither the Mets nor the Phillies have a DH spot to offer the veteran infielder, and the Phillies’ Rhys Hoskins appears to be blocking the way at first base. Then again, Santana may not find a more enticing offer outside of Cleveland, where Edwin Encarnacion might otherwise be the club’s best option at first base. During the GM meetings, Indians’ GM Mike Chernoff said he “love to have both [Santana and Jay Bruce] back” in 2018, but hasn’t backed up that love with any contract talks just yet.