Potent quotables: 12 pieces of bacon and a Red Bull

Leave a comment

“We’ll show up [Sunday], do what we always do on early games, have 12 pieces of bacon, a Red Bull and go get ’em.”



– Terry Francona reveals how the Red Sox will prepare
for a do-or-die matinee with the Angels on Sunday. Clay Buchholz will
attempt to save the season against Scott Kazmir. Kazmir was 2-2 with a
1.73 ERA in six starts with the Angels this season.




“This game can be really weird. I
never would have guessed that we would have swept those guys.”




– Casey Blake comments on his team’s unlikely sweep of the Cardinals.
Though the Dodgers had the better record during the regular season,
they had to face two legitimate Cy Young candidates to start the
series. The Dodgers managed to pull out both games. They carried that
momentum to Game 3 with a dominant effort by Vicente Padilla, who
tossed seven scoreless innings.




“I don’t like the stigma of our club getting swept. We’re a better club than that, and the series was more
competitive than that. But that’s what it is. But today wasn’t a real
good competition.”





– Tony La Russa knows his team is better than the one that showed up for the NLDS. This season marks the first time that the Cardinals have ever been swept in a Division Series or League Championship Series.



“He wasn’t a bad guy at all, as far as I was I was concerned. I didn’t
feel like he stole our money. … I went down with him. He took a lot
of crap, and so did I. I never lost my perspective on what really
happened. It was a move that didn’t work because he didn’t stay
healthy. Do I blame him for it? No I don’t I don’t think he laid down
on us.”




– Yankees general manager Brian Cashman reflects on the much-maligned Carl Pavano signing. Pavano will seek redemption against his former team on Sunday night as the Twins try to keep their season alive.

Justin Verlander named ALCS MVP

Getty Images
3 Comments

Following the Astros’ decisive 4-0 shutout over the Yankees on Saturday night, Justin Verlander was named the Most Valuable Player of the American League Championship Series. Hall of Fame outfielder and former MLB manager Frank Robinson handed the award to Verlander, who was beaming as he thanked his teammates and members of the Astros’ organization.

“I’ve got to say, it came down to the wire, and one thing kept going off in my head was Dallas,” Verlander told the crowd gathered at Minute Maid Park. “When he called me, he said that I won’t regret my decision to join the Houston Astros. And here we are right now, it’s the best feeling in the world. We’ve got four more wins to win a World Series, and I do not regret my decision to come here. This is the best feeling a player can have. So, thank you.”

Among a cast that boasted the likes of Jose Altuve, Carlos Correa and Dallas Keuchel, among others, Verlander was spectacular. He locked down a complete game win in Game 2, holding the Yankees to one run on five hits and a walk and striking out a postseason-high 13 batters. In Game 6, he saved the Astros from elimination with seven scoreless innings, helping propel the club to their eventual 7-1 finish that set up their series-clinching finale on Saturday.

The 34-year-old righty also took his place among some postseason greats. Thanks to an eight-strikeout outing on Friday night, his collective 136 postseason strikeouts are good for sixth-most in MLB playoff history, just a smidgen shy of Tom Glavine (143), Mike Mussina (145), Roger Clemens (173), Andy Pettitte (183) and John Smoltz (199). He also joined Bob Gibson, Curt Schilling and Sandy Koufax as one of just four hurlers to strike out 20+ Yankees in a postseason series.