Managing Jorge Posada's ego

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Joe Girardi, trying to manage Jorge Posada’s feelings over getting benched in favor of Jose Molina:

Yankees manager Joe Girardi had the conversation with Jorge Posada on Sunday, a talk similar to one he had with Joe Torre when Posada was about to cut into Girardi’s time behind the plate.

Girardi didn’t like it, and he didn’t expect Posada to be excited about light-hitting Jose Molina catching A.J. Burnett in the postseason.

“When I played here, we split guys during the playoffs,” Girardi said Thursday. “Of course, you want to play every day. I wouldn’t want a catcher who didn’t want to play every day. That would bother me inside if the guy didn’t want to play every day.”

Given that Posada was the better choice behind the plate both in 1999 and today, I don’t know how this is supposed to make Posada feel any better.

That aside, I think this is more or less a non-story. People really want Posada to fly off the handle I suppose. It would certainly make for some great theater. But (a) Posada just does not seem to be wired like that; and (b) I’d be shocked if Girardi didn’t have a closed door meeting with Posada in which he told him “look, Burnett is a head case and I need to manage his head. I know this is going to chafe your ego a bit, but please do whatever you can to keep cool, OK?”

Maybe it would be different if the Yankees were down 1-0 instead of up, but the most we’re going to ever get out of this are the sorts of “hey, I always want to play” quotes from Posada like we see in the linked article.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.