Adam Wainwright should probably stop his whining

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The St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s and Cardinals’ pitcher Adam Wainwright’s reaction to the Holliday drop:

The Dodgers stretched the inning improbably after left fielder Matt Holliday lost first baseman James Loney’s line drive in the glare of late-afternoon lights and a backdrop of towel-waving fans.

The ball caught Holliday in the stomach, knocking the wind out of everyone wearing road gray.

“He lost the ball in the 50,000 white towels shaking in front of his face,” starting pitcher and would-be hero Adam Wainwright said. “It doesn’t seem really fair that an opposing team should be allowed to shake white towels when there’s a white baseball flying through the air. Dodger blue towels — how about that?”

Except that’s not how it happened. As Dodger Thoughts’ Jon Weisman points out — and as the video from MLB.com appears to show — the towels didn’t seem to be waving until after the drop. Indeed, the Dodgers fans were pretty bummed at that point because they were one out away from a loss and, until the exact moment of the error, assumed that out number three was in the air.  I know the natural reaction is to stand up for your teammate when things are tough, but Wainwright is plain wrong to blame the towels.

But even if they were waving, so what? It’s called home field advantage. If the Cardinals don’t want to deal with hostiles waving white towels, they should have won a couple of extra games in September and finished with a better record than L.A.

Thinking more about it, does anyone remember back in the mid-to-late 80s when NFL quarterbacks used to be able to step out from behind center and get an official time out if the crowd was too loud?  I have this image of Steve Fuller doing this, like, ten times in a row when he played for the Bears. QBs would even get the ref to warn the crowd to be quiet, and if they didn’t, the defense was assessed with a delay of game penalty. It was probably the stupidest rule to ever exist in professional sports.

Thankfully, football players put on their big boy pants and learned to deal and the rule was changed.  As a result homefield advantage meant something once again (at least until all the new sound-killing stadiums came online).  Baseball players should probably learn to suck it up and deal too.

Josh Johnson retires from baseball

PEORIA, AZ - FEBRUARY 21: Josh Johnson #55 of the San Diego Padres poses during Picture Day on February 21, 2014 at the Peoria Sports Complex in Peoria, Arizona. (Photo by Mike McGinnis/Getty Images)
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Oft-injured pitcher Josh Johnson is retiring from baseball, ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick is reporting.

Johnson, 32, hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2013. The right-hander underwent his third Tommy John surgery in September 2015 but wasn’t able to bounce back.

Johnson spent most of his career with the Marlins, but also pitched for the Blue Jays in the big leagues, as well as the Padres in the minors. He retires with a career 3.40 ERA, 915 strikeouts across 998 innings in the majors, and two All-Star nominations. Johnson led the National League with a 2.30 ERA in 2010, finishing fifth in NL Cy Young Award balloting. One wonders what he could have accomplished if he was able to stay healthy.

Report: Angels close to a multi-year deal with Luis Valbuena

HOUSTON, TX - JULY 08:  Luis Valbuena #18 of the Houston Astros hits a three run walkoff home run in the ninth inning to defeat the Oakland Athletics 10-9 at Minute Maid Park on July 8, 2016 in Houston, Texas.  (Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)
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The Angels are nearing a multi-year deal with free agent third baseman Luis Valbuena, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. It’s believed to be a two-year contract with a third-year option.

Valbuena, 31, hit .260/.357/.459 with 13 home runs and 40 RBI in 342 plate appearances in 2016. He missed most of the second half with a hamstring injury, for which he underwent surgery in late August.

Valbuena has played a majority of his career at third base, but also has extensive experience at second base and has racked up innings at first base and shortstop as well. He won’t play every day for the Angels, as Yunel Escobar lays claim to third base and C.J. Cron first base, but he will give them flexibility and a left-handed bat off the bench.