Garret Anderson joins Bill Buckner in the 2,500-hit club

Leave a comment

Last night Garret Anderson became the 89th player in baseball history with 2,500 career hits, which is what happens when you’re a lifetime .295 hitter who rarely takes a walk and have played in 2,145 games.
Anderson has been a solid player for most of his 16 seasons, but a lack of plate discipline and relatively modest power leave him with a career .326 on-base percentage and .465 slugging percentage.
That makes him merely a slightly above average hitter overall, and in fact among all players with 2,500 or more hits Anderson has the seventh-lowest adjusted OPS+ ahead of only five middle infielders, a center fielder, and Bill Buckner:

                       HITS     OPS+
Luis Aparicio          2677      82
Rabbit Maranville      2605      82
Omar Vizquel           2704      83
Doc Cramer             2705      84
Nellie Fox             2663      93
Bill Buckner           2715      99
GARRET ANDERSON        2501     104

Obviously accumulating 2,500 hits is an impressive accomplishment any way you slice it, but doubles and homers are worth more than singles and walks are worth plenty too, which is why focusing on Anderson’s hit total overstates his value quite a bit. Once you account for overall production rather than just “hits” and factor in both position and defensive value, only Buckner has a less-impressive resume for the 2,500-hit club.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

Getty Images

Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.