Tim Hudson is probably coming back to Atlanta

Leave a comment

And that’s without the Braves even exercising his $12 million option, according to the AJC’s Dave O’Brien:

Huddy is a great teammate, beloved in the clubhouse, and he and his
wife do terrific stuff in the community through their foundation. They
have put down roots here, and have finally finished, or nearly
finished, the dream house they built in Auburn, where he went to school.

There’s no doubt in my mind he’d take quite a bit less than $12 mill
per season to stay here in a multi-year extension, probably less than
$10 mill per. And I don’t think any other team would offer him even
that much right now, not until he’s back for a full, healthy and strong
season.

“No doubt in my mind,” says O’Brien. I know a reporter who will remain nameless who told me that the only time good reporters say stuff like that — and O’Brien is a good reporter — is when they have some inside dish that they can’t quite report yet. Makes them seem prescient, you know. My guess is that O’Brien is privy to some informal talks between Hudson and the Braves, or at the very least has had Hudson tell him that, damn skippy, he’s staying in Atlanta no matter what the Braves do with his option.

As O’Brien notes, that leaves the question of what to do about Javier Vazquez up in the air. The conventional wisdom this summer has been that the Braves keep either Hudson or Vazquez, not both.  As a Braves fan my hope would be both, because you can never have too much starting pitching (ask Boston). But there are worse things in the world to have a sub-$10 million Tim Hudson on the team and a near Cy Young-quality starter on the block to fill holes.

Either way, the 2010 Braves may be the early favorites in the NL East.

Yasmany Tomas arrested for reckless driving and criminal speeding

Christian Petersen/Getty Images
27 Comments

KTAR News is reporting that Diamondbacks outfielder Yasmany Tomas was arrested on Thursday morning for driving faster than 100 MPH, according to the Arizona Department of Public Safety. He was charged with reckless driving and criminal speeding.

The maximum sentence for a criminal speeding charge is up to 30 days in jail and a fine up to $500. It is considered a Class 3 misdemeanor. Tomas may also have his license suspended.

A Diamondbacks spokesperson said, “We are very disappointed to learn of this news. We are still gathering facts, and will refrain from further comment at this time as this is a pending legal matter.”

Tomas, 27, signed a six-year, $68.5 million contract with the Diamondbacks in December 2014 as an amateur free agent out of Cuba. He has mostly disappointed, owning a .769 OPS while playing subpar defense in the outfield as well as at third base, where the club briefly tried him. He battled a groin injury for most of the past season and ultimately underwent core muscle surgery in August.