Jim Riggleman and the interim title: Take 2

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For the second straight year Jim Riggleman took over a horrible team at midseason as interim manager. For the second straight year he helped the team become slightly less horrible. And for the second straight year he probably won’t be asked back.
Here’s what Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo–himself an “interim” GM until just recently–said about Riggleman’s chances of managing the team in 2010:

I think Riggleman really did a good job handling the ball club after the All-Star break. I think he put us on pace to really focus and bare down on the fundamentals of the game, to play cleaner and more efficient ballgames. He had the players playing at a high level. I think he has done the best job he could with the ability level that he has.



This is the evaluating time of the year. We are all being evaluated, Jim included. Jim has done a great job. It’s going to be an intense offseason and a busy one. The ultimate goal is to make us a better ball club.

Riggleman has gone 29-42 since taking over the Nationals from Manny Acta and was 36-54 after taking over the Mariners from John McLaren last season. Obviously his combined 65-96 (.403) record in those two stints is hardly impressive, but consider that Washington and Seattle were a combined 51-108 (.320) before he came along. Over the course of a full season, that amounts to a 13-game improvement.
On the other hand Riggleman has now managed 1,245 major-league games for four different teams and has a lifetime 551-694 (.443) record, so while he may be good at turning historic awfulness into run-of-the-mill awfulness he hasn’t done much more than that with past chances. Riggleman is certainly a legitimate candidate for the full-time job, but my guess is that he’ll be part of the interview process before eventually giving way to a bigger, more fan-pleasing name.

Corey Seager will be included on Dodgers’ World Series roster

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Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports that Dodgers shortstop Corey Seager will be on the team’s World Series roster.

Seager, 23, played in the NLDS but was left off the NLCS roster due to a lower back injury suffered in Game 3 against the Diamondbacks. He had three hits, including a triple, in 15 plate appearances in that series. During the regular season, Seager hit .295/.375/.479 with 22 home runs, 77 RBI, and 85 runs scored across 613 PA.

Charlie Culberson and Chris Taylor handled shortstop while Seager was absent. Both players were among the Dodgers’ best performers in the NLCS. With Seager back in the fold, Taylor will play mostly center field and Culberson will return to his bench role.