Stat of the day: 2009 relief ERA leaders

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Minimum 50 innings. Listed along with each pitcher’s ERA are saves+holds and blown saves.
1. George Sherrill – 1.75 – 32 – 5
2. Trevor Hoffman – 1.76 – 36 – 3
3. Mariano Rivera – 1.82 – 44 – 2
4. Jeremy Affeldt – 1.84 – 33 – 0
5. Kiko Calero – 1.86 – 12 – 4
6. Andrew Bailey – 1.88 – 28 – 4
7. Jonathan Papelbon – 1.91 – 37 – 3
8. Darren O’Day – 1.93 – 22 – 0
9. Ryan Franklin – 1.95 – 39 – 5
10. Jose Mijares – 2.07 – 27 – 1
11. Jose Valverde – 2.08 – 26 – 4
12. Ronald Belisario – 2.09 – 12 – 7
13. David Aardsma – 2.10 – 42 – 4
14. Francisco Cordero – 2.19 – 39 – 4
15. LaTroy Hawkins – 2.20 – 30 – 4
16. Joe Nathan – 2.25 – 45 – 5
16. Joakim Soria – 2.25 – 29 – 3
18. Matt Guerrier – 2.33 – 32 – 3
19. Mike Gonzalez – 2.45 – 27 – 7
19. Brian Sanches – 2.45 – 8 – 3
These aren’t baseball’s top 20 relievers this season, but the top 10 or so are all in the mix here.
So who has really been the best? I see three possibilities. Rivera absolutely has to be considered, given that he’s blown just two of his 46 chances. But how about Affeldt? He’s made 72 appearances this year and hasn’t blown a single lead.
And then there’s candidate No. 3: Bailey. The big plus in his corner is that he’s thrown 81 1/3 innings, compared to 64 1/3 for Rivera and 58 2/3 innings for Affeldt. Also, he hasn’t allowed an unearned run all season. Rivera has allowed one and Affeldt two, so Bailey has them beat when you drop the E from ERA. Bailey has blown four leads, but he actually allowed a total of two runs in 5 1/3 innings in those games. Plus, he has six wins, more than Rivera (three) and Affeldt (one) combined.
I’d say it really comes down to Rivera and Bailey, and while you can argue that Bailey’s performance was more valuable, there’s still no doubt that Rivera is the reliever everyone wants protecting that one-run lead in the ninth.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.