Daily Dose: Pirates sticking with Capps … for now

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Since beginning the season with five saves over six straight scoreless appearances Matt Capps has blown five saves in 26 chances while going 4-8 with a 6.61 ERA and .342 opponents’ batting average in 48 innings. Despite six straight months of brutal pitching by Capps general manager Neal Huntington said that the 25-year-old righty will remain the Pirates’ closer next year “barring some unforeseen circumstances.”
In other words, Huntington will spend the winter trying to coax a contender into giving up a decent prospect or two for Capps and if that proves unsuccessful thanks to his collapse or history of arm issues will hand him closer duties again next season in the hopes that he can recoup some value. If healthy Capps is a nice bet to bounce back thanks to a solid 45/17 K/BB ratio amid the overall struggles.
While the Pirates’ boss mentions Joel Hanrahan, Jesse Chavez, and Evan Meek as closing alternatives here are some other notes from around baseball …


* Josh Beckett was scratched from his Monday night start at the last minute because of back spasms. Michael Bowden took Beckett’s place against Toronto and allowed seven runs over three innings in his second career start. Beckett was slated to make his final start of the season Saturday, but Terry Francona said afterward that the Red Sox may have him skip that outing as well to make sure he’s ready for the playoffs.
While the Beckett injury threatens to complicate Boston’s postseason rotation plans, the Red Sox did receive some good news Monday when Jon Lester threw a bullpen session. Lester took a Melky Cabrera line drive off his knee Friday night and initially looked seriously injured, but reported no problems during his regular mound session and has been cleared to make his season finale Thursday against the Indians.
* Andy LaRoche hasn’t done a whole lot since the Dodgers traded him to the Pirates in the Manny Ramirez-Jason Bay deal last July, but had a monster afternoon against his former teammates Monday. LaRoche went 5-for-5 with two homers, two doubles, and six RBIs, giving him a .363 batting average and 11 RBIs in 11 games against the Dodgers compared to .222 with 77 RBIs in 244 games against everyone else.
* LaRoche’s offensive explosion wasn’t the only noteworthy aspect of the Pirates’ win over the Dodgers. Zach Duke took a shutout into the ninth inning before Juan Pierre tripled with one out and Chin-lung Hu scored him with a sacrifice fly. At that point he needed just one more out for his seventh career complete game and had thrown just 103 pitches, yet manager John Russell yanked him with a 10-run lead.
Asked afterward why he didn’t just let Duke get the final out, Russell said: “I wanted Zach to have a nice ovation from the fans. We wanted to give the fans an opportunity to appreciate what he did rather than the game just being over.” You know, because apparently the fans who stuck around for the end of an 11-1 game in franchise’s 17th straight losing season wouldn’t have cheered like hell when Duke got the final out.
AL Quick Hits: Matt Wieters remained hot Monday, going 3-for-4 to raise his batting average to a season-high .292 … Mike Lowell will be unavailable for three days after receiving an injection in his hip Monday, which he last had in July … Impending free agent Russell Branyan (back) is not expected to play again this year … John Danks allowed one run in his first career complete game Monday and is now 13-10 with a 3.69 ERA after going 12-9 with a 3.32 ERA last season … David DeJesus (flu) didn’t join the Royals on their season-ending road trip Monday after missing four straight games … Aaron Laffey took his fifth straight loss Monday despite turning in a Quality Start … Luke Hochevar was rocked for eight runs on a dozen hits Monday, falling to 7-12 with a 6.24 ERA … Chris Tillman has been shut down for the year after logging 164.2 innings between the minors and majors … Monday night’s Twins-Tigers game was rained out, so they’ll play a doubleheader Tuesday.
NL Quick Hits: Jair Jurrjens tossed seven shutout innings Monday and has now won four straight starts while allowing three total runs … Hiroki Kuroda coughed up seven runs Monday after going 5-1 with a 2.73 ERA over his last 10 starts … Cole Hamels dropped to 10-10 by giving up six runs in 6.2 innings Monday … Josh Johnson (flu) will start Tuesday after being scratched from his scheduled weekend outing … Ross Detwiler earned his first MLB victory Monday with six innings of one-run ball and will make one more start this weekend … Anibal Sanchez allowed only two hits over five innings Monday, but handed out a career-high eight walks … Miguel Tejada had four hits Monday and is batting .439 during his 15-game hitting streak … Vicente Padilla will work out of the Dodgers’ bullpen during the final week, but could still get a start in the postseason … Carlos Ruiz is hoping to rejoin the lineup Tuesday after deeming his injured wrist “80 percent” healthy.

2016 postseason playoff shares announced

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OXON HILL, Md — There used to be a time when postseason money was bigger than most players’ actual salaries. Winning a pennant in baseball’s Golden Age was great for its own sake, but if you were one of the guys who hung around with, say, the Yankees for a long time like Frank Crosetti, the money was basically life-changing.

That’s not the case any longer, but the money is still pretty good, as evidenced by the postseason shares handed out for this past postseason, which were just announced and are set forth below.

Shares come from the “players’ pool,” which calculated by taking 50 percent of the gate receipts from the Wild Card Games; 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first three games of the Division Series; 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first four games of the League Championship Series; and 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first four games of the World Series.  The players’ pool is divided among the 10 Postseason Clubs. The 2016 players’ pool was a record total of $76,627,827.09. Last year it was $69,882,149.26.

The clubs themselves decide how many shares to allocate, with the players making decisions regarding which part timers, cup-of-coffee callups, staffers, etc. get. They also have the ability to hand out straight cash awards in whatever amount they want as opposed to a percentage cut of the postseason money.

The breakdown:

  • Chicago Cubs (Share of Players’ Pool: $27,586,017.75; value of each of full share: $368,871.59) – The Cubs issued 66 full shares, a total of 8.7 partial shares and four cash awards;
  • Cleveland Indians (Share of Players’ Pool: $18,390,678.50; value of each of full share: $261,804.65) – The Indians issued 60 full shares, a total of 8.75 partial shares and 16 cash awards.
  • Los Angeles Dodgers (Share of Players’ Pool: $9,195,339.25; value of each of full share: $123,741.24) – The Dodgers issued 65 full shares, a total of 8.285 partial shares and 20 cash awards.
  • Toronto Blue Jays (Share of Players’ Pool: $9,195,339.25; value of each of full share: $123,045.09) – The Blue Jays issued 66 full shares, a total of 7.75 partial shares and 15 cash awards.
  • Boston Red Sox (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $33,761.22) – The Red Sox issued 61 full shares, a total of 10.686 partial shares and 14 cash awards.
  • San Francisco Giants (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $36,443.03) – The Giants issued 57 full shares, a total of 10.5 partial shares and nine cash awards.
  • Texas Rangers (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $38,422.69) – The Rangers issued 54 full shares, a total of 10.19 partial shares and seven cash awards.
  • Washington Nationals (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $35,442.68) – The Nationals issued 60 full shares, a total of 10.209 partial shares and one cash award.
  • Baltimore Orioles (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,149,417.41; value of each of full share: $18,351.02) – The Orioles issued 52 full shares, a total of 8.36 partial shares and 30 cash awards.
  • New York Mets (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,149,417.41; value of each of full share: $17,951.65) – The Mets issued 51 full shares, a total of 12.75 partial shares and five cash awards.

 

Cubs-Royals reportedly agree to the Wade Davis-Jorge Soler deal

KANSAS CITY, MO - APRIL 3:  Wade Davis #17 of the Kansas City Royals throws against the New York Mets at Kauffman Stadium on April 3, 2016 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
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It was rumored to be close last night but now Bob Nightengale of USA Today is reporting that the Cubs and Royals have agreed to the Wade Davis for Jorge Soler deal. Jeff Passan of Yahoo first reported that the deal was close last night. It’s not a completely done deal as the official announcement is pending physicals, but an announcement could come this morning.

Davis has been one of the most dominant relievers in baseball over the past three seasons, posting a 1.18 ERA with 47 saves and a 234/59 K/BB ratio in 182.2 innings. He did, however, miss a lot of time in 2016 — basically the month of August — due to arm trouble and expecting him to be the circa 2014 Wade Davis is probably unrealistic. He’s owed $10 million for 2017 and can become a free agent after the 2017 season. He’ll fill the void left by the departing Aroldis Chapman as Joe Maddon and the World Series champs’ closer.

Soler, who will be 25 when the 2017 season begins, hit .238/.333/.436 with 12 homers and 36 RBI in 86 games last season. He strikes out a lot but takes walks t00 and has shown some good power in short bursts. He’s the sort of player who one could easilsy see putting things together to become a solid regular, which makes him a decent return for giving up a closer in his walk year.