Kung Fu Panda planning offseason weight loss

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Pablo Sandoval is one of my favorite players because he has a body like David Wells, runs like Kung Fu Panda, and hits .330 despite swinging at everything, which is why I’m sort of sad to read that he’s planning to spend the offseason doing “fitness and nutritional training designed to teach him how to keep his weight down”:

At 22, he is putting up terrific numbers despite his weight, which is more than his listed 246 pounds. The team is concerned he will break down unless he learns to eat properly and stay trimmer.



Sandoval acknowledges he does not eat well, particularly on the road, and he understands why he must surrender three weeks of his winter vacation for this training. “I do want to get better,” Sandoval said. “I want to get in good shape and get ready for next season. I don’t want to get hurt. I don’t want to play 120 games. I want to play 162 games.”

On one hand not being in great shape would probably cost Sandoval any chance of sticking at third base long term and dropping a few pounds likely won’t hurt his hitting. On the other hand if he’s going to be a first baseman anyway the extra weight isn’t a huge factor defensively and toting around a nice gut doesn’t seem to hurt guys like Prince Fielder, Adam Dunn, David Ortiz, Carlos Lee, Kyle Blanks, Billy Butler, and Ryan Howard.
A thin Pablo Sandoval might be five percent more valuable, but he’d be about 50 percent less interesting.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: