Cardinals void Mateo's $3.1 million deal

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Three months after signing the 16-year-old outfielder to a record $3.1 million pact, the Cardinals on Tuesday voided Wagner Mateo’s contract, saying he failed his physical based on “pre-existing injuries and physical defects.”
Mateo’s deal was the second-largest ever given to a Latin American teenager and the largest given to a position player. Dominican right-hander Michel Inoa received $4.25 million from the A’s last year.
It was reported by ESPN last week that Wagner had recently underwent several eye examinations to determine if he had a degenerative condition that could jeopardize his future. The results weren’t released, but the assumption is that the Cardinals tried to negotiate a lower bonus for Mateo, failed and then opted to void the deal.
The move could have quite an effect on the Cardinals’ efforts in Latin America for years to come. The Mateo signing was a huge step for an organization that had been quiet in the Dominican Republic and Venezuela of late. Voiding the deal three months after coming to terms will likely make prospects and, more importantly, their handlers wary in the future.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.