Francoeur worthy of a long-term deal?

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If Marty Noble’s awkward “Open letter to Citi Field” wasn’t enough to convince you that he needs this season to end as much as the rest of us, this might:



The Mets believe Francoeur will look sharp in their 2010 uni, so much
so that they are inclined to approach him about signing him to a
three-year contract that would allow him to become a big league Beau
Brummel, if he so chose. They like what they have seen of him in and
out of uniform — from his spirited demeanor to his nuclear arm to the
two doubles he produced Saturday afternoon in their victory against the
Nationals.




And what’s not to like from the Mets’ perspective? Francoeur now has
driven in 34 runs in his 255 plate appearances with the Mets, more than
any Mets player in the same period — Daniel Murphy is second with 31
— and one less than he had driven in 324 plate appearances with the
Braves. Moreover, he has batted .314, scored 30 runs, reduced his rate
of strikeouts, played right field well, continued to intimidate
third-base coaches and baserunners, played hurt and and hit into an
unassisted triple play.




You saved yourself at the end there,
Marty, but I think it’s high time to come home. Anything looks good in
comparison to Ramon Martinez. Francoeur has played well enough be
offered arbitration, but inking him to a long-term deal would be just
as reckless as the Oliver Perez signing.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.