Top 111 Free Agents: Nos. 111-91

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Welcome to a revised and slightly expanded edition of the Top 100 Free Agents. Now it’s 111 free agents-to-be. With four months more to go on, there have been a lot of changes that this article was first published in May. Along with each player’s age, as of April 1, 2010, I’ll be noting where they ranked in the previous edition.
Players who have options essentially guaranteed of being picked up aren’t listed. That list of players includes Carl Crawford, Cliff Lee and Victor Martinez. Also absent are players such as Josh Beckett and Magglio Ordonez, who have already seen their options vest, and Kevin Millwood, whose option figures to vest when he makes his next start.
No Japanese players are included. There doesn’t appear to be anyone the caliber of Kenshin Kawakami or Koji Uehara set to cross the Pacific this winter. The most interesting name being bandied about right now is that of Yusei Kikuchi, and he’s a high school pitcher likely to need a few years of seasoning before he’ll be ready for the majors. Some interesting relief options will probably emerge later, but expectations should be kept low for now.
The players below are ranked based more on how I believe teams perceive them than my own personal viewpoint.
Top 111 Free Agents
111. Jerry Hairston Jr. (33) – Prev. NR – After a fluke 2008 season, Hairston has fallen to .252/.313/.399 in 373 at-bats this season. It’s his versatility that’s his biggest asset, and he’s a whole lot more useful to a team like the Yankees than he was playing everyday as a member of the Reds.
110. Bobby Crosby (30) – Prev. #87 – Sadly, Crosby’s .225/.297/.367 line gives him his highest OPS since 2005, and what little he’s gained there has been countered by his surprisingly poor play on defense. There will be teams interested in trying to turn his career around, but the former Rookie of the Year will have to compete for a starting job next spring.
109. Jason Kendall (35) – Prev. #97 – Incredibly, he’s still starting five out of every six games for the Brewers even though he’s slugging .290, he’s throwing out just 19 percent of would-be basestealers and not one of the starting pitchers he’s handled has exceeded expectations. He’ll finish the season third or fourth in the majors in innings caught. The numbers say he should be a seldom-used backup. History suggests some team will settle for him as a starter.
108. Reed Johnson (33) – Prev. #88 – Fits in the useful-but-injury-prone category, right alongside near miss Endy Chavez. Johnson hit .306/.386/.452 in 62 at-bats against lefties before getting hurt this year, and he’s scored 72 runs and driven in 70 in 480 at-bats for the Cubs over the last two seasons.
107. Gary Sheffield (41) – Prev. NR – Sheffield has showed he has something left by hitting .279/.371/.457 while playing half of his games in a pitcher’s park. Still, his isn’t the kind of veteran leadership that most teams crave. Plus, he thinks he’s an everyday outfielder when he’d be of more use as a role player and part-time DH. Since he wants the 311 hits he needs to reach 3,000, his best bet would be to sign with a non-contender.
106. Brian Schneider (33) – Prev. #80 – Schneider deserved a Gold Glove or two when he was in his prime, but his defense has fallen off just as much as his offense and he should be viewed as a backup going forward. Perhaps he’ll return to the Nationals with the team in need of protection for Jesus Flores.
105. Scott Podsednik (34) – Prev. NR – Podsednik’s best OPS in the five years since he hit .314/.379/.443 for the Brewers in 2003 was a 700 mark in 2005. Right now, he’s hitting .303/.352/.412 to put him at 764. He’s just an average defender in left and a below average one in center, so he’s not an adequate regular unless he’s hitting around .300. Still, he’ll probably be starting somewhere.
104. Kelvim Escobar (34) – Prev. #65 – Shoulder problems have limited Escobar to five innings in two seasons, so he’s probably going to be in line for a minor league deal this winter. He’ll be a better bet if he’s willing to spend 2010 as a reliever. There just isn’t much chance of him holding up as a starter.
103. Yorvit Torrealba* (31) – Prev. NR – While he recently won back his starting job from Chris Iannetta, Torrealba shouldn’t be in the Rockies’ plans for 2010. He has a $4 million mutual option that the Rockies can buy out for $500,000.
102. Geoff Blum (36) – Prev. NR – Injuries have held him back lately or he’d already be there, but Blum is still going to set a new personal high for starts at one position this year at age 36. He’s made 86 at third base, five fewer than his current high of 91 from 2002 (also at third base and also with the Astros). Houston will probably want him back in 2010, but hopefully it will be as a utilityman.
101. Garret Anderson (37) – Prev. #99 – Anderson turned in a big July to momentarily get his OPS up to 800, but he’s currently down to .275/.313/.415 and still fading. His lack of a platoon split, always a nice feature early in his career, is actually a problem now. He’s just not good enough to start against righties or lefties.
100. Khalil Greene (30) – Prev. #45 – Getting out of Petco Park figured to be just the thing to change Greene’s fortunes, but he got off to an awful start both offensively and defensively for the Cardinals and he’s been shelved twice with anxiety issues. Where he goes from here is anyone’s guess. Physically, he should still be able to play a capable shortstop and hit 20 homers per year.
99. Freddy Garcia* (33) – Prev. NR – With his velocity creeping back up, Garcia is again looking like a viable major league pitcher, and he has the 4.41 ERA and 1.30 WHIP in six starts for the White Sox to prove it. As it turns out, he likely miscalculated in giving the White Sox such an inexpensive option to bring him back for next year. He’ll be guaranteed only $1 million.
98. Adam Kennedy (34) – Prev. NR – Kennedy couldn’t find any team willing to give him a shot at a starting job this spring — he ended up signing with a Rays team that was already set at second base — but he’s gone on to have maybe the second-best offensive season of his career. He’s hit .287/.348/.402 and stolen 19 bases in 24 attempts, and he’s proven playable at third after spending the first 10 years of his career at second. The A’s will likely look to re-sign him as Eric Chavez insurance, but others may give him the opportunity to start at second.
97. Joe Crede (31) – Prev. #77 – Crede is again on the shelf with his chronic back troubles, and he didn’t hit enough to justify regular playing time at third base while healthy this season. He shouldn’t be handed another starting job.
96. Bob Howry (36) – Prev. NR – Howry’s ERA has rebounded from 5.35 in his final season with the Cubs to 3.43 this year, but his strikeout rate has dipped three straight years. He’ll almost certainly want to stay in the National League, and there’s a good chance he’ll re-up with the Giants for something close to the $2.75 million he’s currently making.
95. Juan Uribe (31) – Prev. NR – It never made much sense that Edgar Renteria received $18.5 million and Uribe had to settle for a minor league deal last winter. Then again, the fact that he was properly motivated again probably has had a lot to do with Uribe busting out and hitting .290/.331/.500 in 338 at-bats for the Giants. He no longer has the range to be a starting shortstop in the majors, but he can serve as a backup there and he’s a quality defender at second and third. He should be a fine utilityman for a few more years.
94. Melvin Mora* (38) – Prev. #64 – Mora definitely needed a late surge if he hoped to be viewed as a regular this winter, and he appears to be in the midst of one, as he’s hitting .350/.381/.525 this month. That puts him at .266/.324/.362 for the year. The Orioles aren’t going to pick up his $8 million option.
93. Jose Contreras (38) – Prev. #100 – Contreras compiled a 5.14 ERA for the White Sox, but his peripherals weren’t bad and it looked like he might be the last of several starters this year to revive his career in the NL before suffering a quad strain in his second start with the Rockies. Of course, he’s not really 38, but that hardly matters when he’s still throwing in the low-90s consistently.
92. Guillermo Mota (36) – Prev. NR – He’s a cheater, a coward and just about the last pitcher anyone should want working in a big situation in a big game, but Mota also has a 1.67 ERA in 43 innings since the beginning of June. That will probably earn him a raise from the $2.35 million the Dodgers gave him last winter.
91. Ronnie Belliard (34) – Prev. #90 – The subject of retirement came up when Belliard was stuck in a bit role with the Nationals during the first half, but he’s rebounded to hit .321/.362/.527 in 131 at-bats during the second half. If the numbers are to be believed, he’s still perfectly adequate at second base and an above average regular overall.

Red Sox move Clay Buchholz to the bullpen

BOSTON, MA - MAY 26:  Clay Buchholz #11 of the Boston Red Sox is relieved during the sixth inning against the Colorado Rockies  at Fenway Park on May 26, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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Red Sox manager John Farrell announced Friday that Clay Buchholz has been moved to the bullpen.

Buchholz was lit up for six runs on Thursday in just the latest poor outing in a year full of them thus far. His ERA now sits at a lofty 6.35 and he is posting a career low strikeout rate of 5.9 per nine innings while both his walk rate and his home run rates have spiked. His WHIP — 1.465 — is the worst he’s posted since 2008.

Eduardo Rodriguez will take his place in the rotation when he comes off the disabled list. He’ll get what would have been Buchholz’s next start on Tuesday.

According to the depth chart, Buchholz was the Red Sox’ second starter. He’s been their worst starter by far this year, however, and now he’s likely a long man who will be seeing mopup duty for the foreseeable future.

Jurickson Profar called up, to get his first MLB action since 2013

Jurickson Profar
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The Texas Rangers have called up infielder Jurickson Profar from Triple-A Round Rock. He’s starting at second base and batting leadoff for the Rangers.

Profar has not seen action in the bigs since the end of the 2013 season, having missed two seasons with shoulder injuries. He has batted .284/.356/.426 with five homers and four steals across 189 plate appearances with Round Rock this season, however, and seems to be healthy again. His stay with the Rangers could be short — he’s basically coming up to fill in for Roughned Odor — but he’s still just 23 and it’s not hard to imagine him making another go of it as a big league regular eventually.

Here’s hoping anyway.

Jose Bautista’s suspension is upheld

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Major League Baseball has upheld Jose Bautista‘s one-game suspension arising out of the Rougned Odor fracas. Bautista tried to have it thrown out on appeal, but really, if you get one game they’re not gonna budge on that. Maybe if they start with half-game suspensions they’ll be room to work, but when the choice is one or none, MLB is going to stick with one.

Bautista will serve the suspension tonight against the Red Sox. Ezequiel Carrera will take his place in right field.

What’s on tap: previewing tonight’s action

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - JULY 13:  Julio Urias of the World Team during the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game at Target Field on July 13, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
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The big game is in New York, where Julio Urias makes his major league debut against Jacob deGrom and the New York Mets. Urias, 19, has 27 consecutive scoreless innings under his belt. All at Triple-A, of course. The debuts of young pitchers tend not to go too well, but at the very least you’ll see a guy with electric stuff and you’ll be able to say you saw him back when he was just a lad.

Another nice matchup pits Jaime Garcia against Max Scherzer. Garcia has struggled of late but is always capable of a big game. Scherzer has had some of the biggest games of the past couple of years. Masahiro Tanaka vs. Chris Archer is another matchup with star power, even if Archer hasn’t lived up to his billing of late. Tanaka has only pitched on game in Tropicana Field but it was a great game, tossing seven shutout innings while striking out eight. He may be the only person alive who likes it there.

Here’s tonight’s slate. And, well, this afternoon’s game in Chicago too:

Philadelphia Phillies (Adam Morgan) @ Chicago Cubs (Jon Lester), 2:20 PM EDT, Wrigley Field

St. Louis Cardinals (Jaime Garcia) @ Washington Nationals (Max Scherzer), 7:05 PM EDT, Nationals Park

Boston Red Sox (Joe Kelly) @ Toronto Blue Jays (Aaron Sanchez), 7:07 PM EDT, Rogers Centre

Baltimore Orioles (Mike Wright) @ Cleveland Indians (Trevor Bauer), 7:10 PM EDT, Progressive Field

Los Angeles Dodgers (Julio Urias) @ New York Mets (Jacob deGrom), 7:10 PM EDT, Citi Field

New York Yankees (Masahiro Tanaka) @ Tampa Bay Rays (Chris Archer), 7:10 PM EDT, Tropicana Field

Miami Marlins (Adam Conley) @ Atlanta Braves (Williams Perez), 7:35 PM EDT, Turner Field

Pittsburgh Pirates (Jonathon Niese) @ Texas Rangers (Cole Hamels), 8:05 PM EDT, Globe Life Park in Arlington

Cincinnati Reds (John Lamb) @ Milwaukee Brewers (Zach Davies), 8:10 PM EDT, Miller Park

Chicago White Sox (Miguel Gonzalez) @ Kansas City Royals (Danny Duffy), 8:15 PM EDT, Kauffman Stadium

San Francisco Giants (Matt Cain) @ Colorado Rockies (Tyler Chatwood), 8:40 PM EDT, Coors Field

San Diego Padres (Christian Friedrich) @ Arizona Diamondbacks (Robbie Ray), 9:40 PM EDT, Chase Field

Detroit Tigers (Michael Fulmer) @ Oakland Athletics (Sean Manaea), 10:05 PM EDT, Oakland Coliseum

Houston Astros (Mike Fiers) @ Los Angeles Angels (Matt Shoemaker), 10:05 PM EDT, Angel Stadium of Anaheim