Stat of the day: Eastern League OPS & ERA leaders

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Top 10 OPS
1. Carlos Santana (Indians) – 943
2. Neil Sellers (Phillies) – 869
3. Brock Bond (Giants) – 838
4. Brian Stavisky (Phillies) – 831
5. Brett Pill (Giants) – 828
6. Brennan Boesch (Tigers) – 828
7. Brian Dinkelman (Twins) – 824
8. Deik Scram (Tigers) – 819
9. Josh Thole (Mets) – 816
10. Kevin Mahar (Phillies) – 815
– Obviously, many of the more interesting players didn’t qualify. Pedro Alvarez, the second overall pick in the 2008 draft, came in at 1009 in 60 games. Phillies outfielder Michael Taylor was at 977 in 86 games. The Orioles’ Brandon Snyder was promoted after posting a 1018 mark in 58 games.
– Santana never received a promotion, though he clearly deserved one for the work he did offensively. The problem is that the 23-year-old is still rather raw defensively behind the plate after beginning his pro career as an outfielder. He has the tools to make it as a starting catcher, but he’s likely going to need another full year in the minors in 2010.
– Bond’s 838 OPS was very impressive for a guy who played half of his games in one of the best parks for pitchers in the minors. Still, his league-leading 429 OBP would have counted for more if he wasn’t caught stealing on 15 of his 28 attempts.
– Other notables: Alex Avila (Tigers) – 814, Nick Weglarz (Indians) – 808, Ryan Kalish (Red Sox) – 781, Ruben Tejada (Mets) – 732, David Cooper (Blue Jays) – 729, Beau Mills (Indians) – 724, Brad Emaus (Blue Jays) – 712, Lars Anderson (Red Sox) – 673, Cale Iorg (Tigers) – 610
Top 10 ERA
1. Zach McAllister (Yankees) – 2.23
2. Felix Doubront (Red Sox) – 3.35
3. Jeanmar Gomez (Indians) – 3.43
4. Luis Perez (Blue Jays) – 3.55
5. Matt Fox (Twins) – 3.58
6. Randy Boone (Blue Jays) – 3.70
7. Danny Moskos (Pirates) – 3.74
8. Erik Arnesen (Nationals) – 3.87
9. Ryan Mullins (Twins) – 4.03
10. Jon Kibler (Tigers) – 4.06
– Non-qualifiers included Madison Bumgarner (1.93 ERA in 107 IP), Brad Lincoln (2.28 EREA in 75 IP), Ryan Edell (2.32 ERA in 89 1/3 IP), Brandon Erbe (2.34 ERA in 73 IP) and Junichi Tazawa (2.57 ERA in 98 IP).
– Also clearly deserving of mention was Yankees prospect Josh Schmidt, who had a 1.61 ERA in five starts and 41 relief appearances.
– McAllister was the league’s best pitcher, and he had the 1.08 WHIP to back up his ERA. Still, his season wasn’t quite as encouraging as the numbers suggest, if only because his previously strong groundball rate dwindled. He ended up as a modest flyball pitcher, and given that he’s probably not going to be a big strikeout guy in the majors, he’s going to have to induce grounders to thrive.
– Doubront’s ERA was more of a fluke, as he allowed 14 unearned runs and finished with a 1.41 WHIP, thanks to the 52 walks he surrendered in 121 innings. The 21-year-old lefty is a fine prospect without much of a platoon split, but he shouldn’t be counted on to be so effective in Triple-A next year.

The Nats are going to sign Francisco Rodriguez for some reason

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The Nationals bullpen is a tire fire. They’re about to add another tire. Per Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Washington is about to sign free agent reliever Francisco Rodriguez.

K-Rod was released by the Tigers last week after posting an ERA of 7.82 over 28 appearances this season. He has a 1.658 WHIP, is allowing 11.9 hits per nine innings and is posting his highest walk rate in five years. Also worth noting: the Detroit Friggin’ Tigers decided that he was not good enough to be in their bullpen.

So, yeah, good luck with that Washington.

The Giants chemistry is suffering because a guy they all hated is gone

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I’ve spent years arguing with people about team chemistry. You know the battle lines on all of that now: people who talk a lot about team chemistry tend to attribute winning or losing to good or bad chemistry, respectively. I tend to think that characterizing chemistry is a retroactive exercise in which teams that win are happy and then cite their happiness as the reason and vice versa. Jim Leyland agrees with me, for what it’s worth, so I’m pretty happy with my take.

Not that I’ll claim a monopoly on wisdom here. I’ve never played on a professional baseball team. I don’t know what it’s like to try to prepare to play baseball while surrounded by jackwagons who don’t get along with anyone. I can’t imagine that makes life easier. Indeed, based on the testimony of players I have spoken to, I will grant that there is at least some intangible yet real benefit if everyone is happy an gelling. I dismiss team chemistry arguments for the most part, but if I ran a team I’d at least try to get rid of bad seeds if their bad seeding was not outweighed by seriously outstanding on-the-field play. You want your workers happy, folks.

All of which makes me wonder what the heck to do about this passage from Ken Rosenthal’s latest column. It’s about the reeling San Francisco Giants. They have all kinds of issues — their offense is putrid, their pitching isn’t much better and they’ve been without their ace most of the year — but today Rosenthal looks at their team chemistry. It’s a quiet and subdued clubhouse, he notes, and it has a lot of people wondering if something is wrong there. What could it be?

Sandoval, who was an often noisy and boisterous presence during his time with the club, departed as a free agent after that season. Pence has suffered a number of injuries in recent years and declined offensively, making it difficult for him to be as vocal as he was in the past. Some with the Giants muse that the team even misses Angel Pagan, who created an odd sort of unity because most of the players disliked him.

Read that last sentence again. And then go on with your talk about how team chemistry is a legitimate explanatory concept regarding what makes teams win or lose as opposed to a post-hoc rationalization of it.

Not that it’s not a good article overall. There’s some interesting stuff about the Giants’ bullpen culture. And, of course, we now know why no one signed Pagan last winter.