Wanna buy Lenny Dykstra's World Series ring?

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Lenny Dykstra’s post-playing days have been nothing if not colorful. He ran a chain of car washes, then built himself into some sort of financial guru, becoming a columnist for TheStreet.com, starting a magazine that counseled athletes about how to invest their money, bought Wayne Gretzky’s mansion, had people make all kinds of steroids allegations against him, was accused of being a racist and a homophobe and the worst boss in the history of bosses, and finally — and not surprisingly — filed for bankruptcy.

That’s a lot to fit into a single decade, but Lenny Dykstra always did give 110%. But for all of his triumphs and troubles, and for as big of a jackass Dykstra is reported to be, this has me feeling sorry for the guy this morning:

The bankrupt ex-ballplayer is auctioning off memorabilia from across his storied 12-year career – including his diamond and gold 1986 World Series championship ring. The bidders are unlikely to include the nearly two dozen businesses and individuals who charge the hardnosed player known as Nails bilked them of millions of dollars. The most amazin’ item available is Dykstra’s 10-karat World Series ring, symbolic of the Mets’ stunning defeat of the Boston Red Sox. The sparkler – valued at $20,000 – bears the Mets logo, Dykstra’s name and familiar No. 4, and the words “New York Mets, 1986 World Champions, 116 Wins.”

Sympathy for any man facing such tribulations aside, given how Dykstra’s post-baseball business dealings have gone, I’d (a) demand a certificate of authenticity for that ring; and (b) demand that it be sanitized to remove all traces of skeeze.

Report: Mets ownership backs Terry Collins

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The Mets entered Sunday night’s game against the Pirates with a disappointing 20-27 record. While the club has dealt with a litany of injuries, manager Terry Collins has also drawn criticism for in-game decision-making, particularly regarding his decision-making.

Owner Fred Wilpon is still Collins’ strongest supporter, however, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports. As a result, the team is unlikely to make a managerial change anytime soon. If the Mets continue to struggle, though, ownership may feel pressured to make a change.

Collins became the longest-tenured manager in Mets history last week. Collins managed the Mets to a 77-85 record in 2011 and has overall helped the club go 501-518, winning the NL Pennant in 2015. He is not signed to a contract beyond this season.

Joe Mauer becomes first Twin to reach base seven times in a game since Rod Carew

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Twins first baseman Joe Mauer had a game for the record books on Sunday against the Rays. He finished 4-for-5 with an RBI double, a solo home run, two singles, and three walks in eight plate appearances. Unfortunately for him, the Twins still lost 8-6 in 15 innings.

ESPN’s Stats & Info notes that Mauer is the first Twin to reach base seven times in one game since Rod Carew in 1972 against the Brewers. The last player to reach base seven times in one game (without the aid of an error) was Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford on August 8 last season against the Marlins. The feat has only been accomplished seven times this decade, so about once a year.

After Sunday’s game, Mauer is batting .283/.363/.408 with three home runs, 18 RBI, and 23 runs scored in 171 plate appearances. Not too shabby.