And That Happened: Wednesday's scores and highlights

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Cardinals 5, Brewers 1: Albert Pujols hits two homers and Adam
Wainwright throws seven shutout innings to claim his 18th win. Tony La
Russa was asked after the game if Pujols should win the MVP. What’s
Tony say? “Those are the kind of questions that are distracting and I
don’t answer them.” Pujols is hitting .331 with 47 homers and 124 RBIs
and is the most important player to the St. Louis Cardinals since
Musial retired and you can’t go way the hell out on a limb to say that,
yeah, in your considered opinion he’s the MVP? Christ on a crutch,
Tony, this is why so many people can’t stand you.

Diamondbacks 4, Dodgers 3: L.A. walks in the winning run– or
losing run, depending on how you view these things — in the ninth.
Before the winning/losing walk, however, there was a runner on third,
and Torre offered intentional passes to two Dbacks to load the bases.
I’ve never understood that move, especially with less than two outs.
Colorado is 2.5 back.

Astros 2, Braves 1: I’m guessing that after this one, Javier
Vazquez took young Tommy Hanson aside and told him that this is just
how pitching for the 2009 Braves goes, ya know? Eight innings, no runs,
no walks, seven strikeouts, no decision and the team loses because they
simply can’t score any runs. Oh, and Rafael Soriano is a shell of
whatever he was for those handful of games over the past couple of
years when he actually looked good. Bobby Cox: sit everyone down who
has a future with this team, play out the rest of the season with
whatever organizational soldiers you can muster, and regroup for 2010.

Marlins 6, Mets 3: The Mets took their team photo before the
game, with Jose Reyes, Johan Santana and Carlos Delgado in uniform. I
hope the stadium was closed to the fans at the time, because if not,
that’s pretty damn cruel, ain’t it?

Twins 4, Blue Jays 1: After a stellar start his last time out,
Roy Halladay’s nightmare second half continues. Well, nightmare is a
relative term — he pitched well despite taking the loss — but when
Carl Pavano outshines you, it’s not your best day. The crowd — 11,159
— was the smallest in the 20-year history of Rogers Centre/Sky Dome.
In the Jays’ defense, the Leafs’ rookie team was playing a preseason game in Kitchener last night.

Red Sox 7, Orioles 5: A pinch hit, three-run double from Victor
Martinez helps the Sox maintain their two-game lead over Texas. And if
you’ll pardon the partisanship here, allow me to say that in light of
the thirteen pitchers used and the 3:41 it took for this nine-inning
affair, I’m rooting like hell that the Rangers eke these guys out so
that I can get to bed at a decent hour once the playoffs start.

Phillies 6, Nationals 5: And your closer is . . . Ryan Madson.
This despite the fact that Manuel sorta kinda put his support behind
Lidge on Tuesday night. Having Manuel say that and then send Madson out
is the baseball equivalent of having your boss tell you how much he
likes you and then turning around and deactivating your keycard.

Padres 4, Giants 2: If the Giants want to look anywhere when
trying to figure out why they never caught the Rockies this year, they
can look at their 6-9 record against the Padres. Heath Bell is tied for
the league lead with 27 saves. Not bad for a team currently in a
dogfight to avoid last place.

Yankees 4, Rays 2: Another one of those silly three-inning Joba
Chamberlain starts doesn’t prevent the Yankees from handing the Rays
their eighth straight loss. And oh yeah, Jeter tied Gehrig for the team
lead in hits. I know no one is really tracking that, so I thought I’d
remind everyone.

Cubs 8, Pirates 5: Carlos Zambrano wins for the first time since
July 22nd as the Pirates just go through the motions and their fans
await Steelers and Penguins season.

Rangers 10, Indians 0: I’m guessing Marlon Byrd would like to
hit against Cleveland every day (2-4, HR 4 RBI). Esteban German, too,
as he went 5 for 5. Fausto Carmona lasted two whole thirds of an
inning, and from the looks of him, if the Indians are planning on
entering spring training 2010 counting on him to be in the rotation,
they’re deluding themselves.

Rockies 4, Reds 3: The Reds take the lead on a Scott Rolen homer
in the top of the ninth, but lose it on a Francisco Cordero meltdown in
the bottom of the ninth.

Royals 5, Tigers 1: Break up the Royals, as they’ve won three in
a row. Verlander takes the loss, which is relevant only insofar as it
relates to his Cy Young chances. Fernando Rodney probably has a beef
with the suspension he was given, but one wonders why he didn’t just
accept it and sit these games out against the Royals. He appealed,
however, and allowed himself the opportunity to give up three runs on
two hits with a walk in a basically meaningless game.

White Sox 4, Athletics 3: Tons of zeros put up by the bullpens
in this 13-inning affair. Octavio Dotel’s three scoreless innings to
end it were the most important.

Angels 6, Mariners 3: Jered Weaver allows two runs in six and a
third, and the Angels, unlike the Dodgers, keep their lead over the
upstart team behind them.

Theo Epstein on sportswriters: “The life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself…”

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - OCTOBER 07:  Chicago Cubs general manager Theo Epstein stands on the field during batting practice before the game between the Chicago Cubs and the San Francisco Giants at Wrigley Field on October 7, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Rick Morissey of the Chicago Sun-Times published an article on Sunday giving a bit of insight into Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein. When Epsten was younger, he dabbled in sportswriting, but quickly realized the trade wasn’t for him.

As Morissey details, when Epstein was 19 years old writing for Yale’s student newspaper, he wrote an article suggesting the school’s football coach should be fired during what would become a 3-7 season. Epstein was told during the meeting that one writer would defend the coach and one would call for his job. “It was a lesson in the way that the world of journalism sometimes works. It was an eye-opener for me. I regret it, and I’ve happily moved on.”

Epstein continued, “I realized I didn’t want to be a sportswriter when I was interning with the Orioles back in ’92, ’93, ’94. I did do a lot of media-relations stuff, and I saw that the life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself in the press box, go back to the hotel bar. Not to generalize.” He added, “But I really respect writing and respect sportswriters.”

He’s not wrong, and he seems to have found his calling as a front office executive. His Cubs are back in the World Series for the first time since 1945.

Jason Kipnis injured his ankle celebrating the pennant with Francisco Lindor

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 17:  Jose Ramirez #11, Francisco Lindor #12, Jason Kipnis #22 and Mike Napoli #26 of the Cleveland Indians celebrate after defeating the Toronto Blue Jays with a score of 4 to 2 in game three of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images

Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis tweeted on Sunday, “Got a little too close to [Francisco Lindor] during the celebration!! Freak accident but should be good to go by Tuesday! #cantkeepmeoutofthisgame!”

Per’s Jordan Bastian, manager Terry Francona said Kipnis is dealing with a low ankle sprain, but he’s expected to be ready to go when the World Series begins on Tuesday. Kipnis went through fielding drills on Sunday.

Kipnis is hitting .167/.219/.367 with a pair of homers and four RBI in eight games this postseason.