What happened to the playoff races?

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rockies_090907.jpgAre the playoff races all but over? From the Washington Post

Baseball’s playoff race died suddenly this weekend of natural causes. It was five months old. Survivors include the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Yankees, Philadelphia Phillies, Detroit Tigers, Los Angeles Angels and Los Angeles Dodgers.

Indeed this weekend was rough on some of the contenders.

(See standings here, and an analysis of the races here)

The Texas Rangers went 1-2 against the lowly Orioles to lose ground on the Angels and miss a chance to gain on the Red Sox. The Tampa Bay Rays, after Monday’s disastrous double-header sweep against the Yankees — and six straight losses — are toast. The Twins dropped two of three to the Indians to fall 6 1/2 behind the Tigers.

In the NL, the Marlins and Braves don’t appear capable of making a run at the Phillies. The Rockies and Giants are hanging close to the Dodgers, but one gets the feeling that L.A. can hold their divisional lessers at arm’s length the rest of the way. And the Cubs? Well, at least they won’t have to blame the curse on a playoff collapse.

Only the wild card races are tight, with the Rangers standings 2 1/2 behind the Red Sox, and the Giants two behind the Rockies. But even those two races aren’t as up-for-grabs as they may seem.

Over at http://www.coolstandings.com, the math goes like this: The eight projected playoff teams (the six division leaders plus the two wild card leaders) have between a 70.5 percent chance (the Rockies) and a 99.9 percent chance (the AL East-leading Yankees) of going to the postseason, while among the pursuers, only the Giants (at 27.4 percent) have a better than one-in-four chance.

It doesn’t bode well for an exciting September, but I guess you never know. Someone might have a run in them yet. Let’s hope so.

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Sean Manaea has a no-hitter through eight innings

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UPDATE (11:06 PM ET): Manaea is through eight innings of his no-hitter. He caught Rafael Devers looking, then induced a pop-up to retire Sandy Leon and whiffed Jackie Bradley Jr. to end the inning. He’s at 95 pitches and a career-high 10 strikeouts entering the ninth.

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea has no-hit the Red Sox through seven innings of Saturday’s game. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea held the Sox to just three total baserunners through the first seven innings.

Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning, collecting an infield hit for what appeared to be the Red Sox’ first hit of the evening. Upon further review, however, the hit was reversed after Benintendi incurred a batter interference call for running outside the baseline.

Manaea is currently working with a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth. He’s racked up eight strikeouts against 23 batters so far.

If Manaea sees the no-hitter through to completion — as seems entirely possible, given that his pitch count is resting at 84 entering the eighth — he’ll be the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter, meanwhile, was back in 1993 against the Mariners’ Chris Bosio.