The Athletics get a step closer to San Jose

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The City of San Jose has received the results of a commission studying the economic impact of a new downtown stadium for the Athletics. Not surprisingly, the report says it would be a dandy idea:

The development of a 32,000-seat ballpark with 81 home games and three non-MLB events a year would lead to $130 million in annual spending throughout the local economy and $2.9 billion over a 30-year period.

The analysis also shows that a new stadium would create 2,100 full-time, part-time and seasonal jobs in San Jose, of which 980 would be new jobs. That number does not include players but does include team personnel.>

Of course every single pre-construction study like this ever devised has said that a new ballpark would cause cash and unicorns and stuff to fall from the sky and it doesn’t really ever turn out that way, so people shouldn’t get too excited.

My view is that the A’s need a new park, that San Jose seems like the best option, and that as long as taxpayers aren’t footing the bill, go ahead and build.  The thing, though, is that city officials shouldn’t be selling it to citizens as an economic development tool, because that just never pans out the way people say it will. Rather, they should be honest and say it’s a civic pride thing, and that they’re willing to pay a bit of money around the edges for land and infrastructure improvements if it means that they’ll get a big league team. Mostly because it has the benefit of being true.

The most interesting thing in all of this comes late in the article: “San Jose must be included in the team’s name, the city insists.”  I can’t figure that the A’s would have kept the “Oakland” appelation after moving so far anyway — and it’s not like they haven’t changed things up multiple times in the past — but it will be odd to say the “San Jose A’s.”  Cool-sounding, but odd.

Josh Johnson retires from baseball

PEORIA, AZ - FEBRUARY 21: Josh Johnson #55 of the San Diego Padres poses during Picture Day on February 21, 2014 at the Peoria Sports Complex in Peoria, Arizona. (Photo by Mike McGinnis/Getty Images)
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Oft-injured pitcher Josh Johnson is retiring from baseball, ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick is reporting.

Johnson, 32, hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2013. The right-hander underwent his third Tommy John surgery in September 2015 but wasn’t able to bounce back.

Johnson spent most of his career with the Marlins, but also pitched for the Blue Jays in the big leagues, as well as the Padres in the minors. He retires with a career 3.40 ERA, 915 strikeouts across 998 innings in the majors, and two All-Star nominations. Johnson led the National League with a 2.30 ERA in 2010, finishing fifth in NL Cy Young Award balloting. One wonders what he could have accomplished if he was able to stay healthy.

Report: Angels close to a multi-year deal with Luis Valbuena

HOUSTON, TX - JULY 08:  Luis Valbuena #18 of the Houston Astros hits a three run walkoff home run in the ninth inning to defeat the Oakland Athletics 10-9 at Minute Maid Park on July 8, 2016 in Houston, Texas.  (Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)
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The Angels are nearing a multi-year deal with free agent third baseman Luis Valbuena, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. It’s believed to be a two-year contract with a third-year option.

Valbuena, 31, hit .260/.357/.459 with 13 home runs and 40 RBI in 342 plate appearances in 2016. He missed most of the second half with a hamstring injury, for which he underwent surgery in late August.

Valbuena has played a majority of his career at third base, but also has extensive experience at second base and has racked up innings at first base and shortstop as well. He won’t play every day for the Angels, as Yunel Escobar lays claim to third base and C.J. Cron first base, but he will give them flexibility and a left-handed bat off the bench.