Link-O-Rama: A-Rod notches 2,500 career hit

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* Last night Alex Rodriguez delivered his 2,500th career hit, which is remarkable given that this is his age-33 season. The only players in baseball history with more hits than Rodriguez through the age of 33 are Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, Hank Aaron, Robin Yount, Mel Ott, and Jimmie Foxx. And he can pass Foxx and Ott with a strong September.
Since rejoining the lineup on May 8 following hip surgery Rodriguez ranks among the AL’s top five in homers, RBIs, walks, and on-base percentage. Oh, and overall this season the Yankees are 66-32 (.673) when Rodriguez starts and 19-16 (.542) when he doesn’t. Meanwhile, the media in New York can’t seem to decide whether to hype Mark Teixeira or Derek Jeter as the person to steal the MVP from Joe Mauer.
* David Biderman of the Wall Street Journal studied every team’s play-by-play announcer to determine who talks the most and found that the chattiest guy (Dan McLaughlin of the Cardinals) said twice as many words per minute as the least-chattiest guy (Duane Kuiper of the Giants). Actually, Vin Scully said by far the most words per minute, but a) he’s the only play-by-play guy who works without a partner/analyst, and b) he’s Vin Scully.
* Jarrod Saltalmacchia returned from the disabled list yesterday, but still expects to undergo surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome once the season ends and may be limited to bench duties down the stretch.
* Grady Sizemore is also talking about surgery and may opt to have his injured elbow operated on before the season ends. “I see both sides,” Sizemore said. “Every player wants to be out there and finish the season. But I understand the logic behind the conversation. They want to put me in a position to where I’m strong for next year.”

If the Tigers are sub-.500 at the end of June it’ll be fire sale time

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Jon Morosi reports that that the Detroit Tigers will make all veterans available via trade if they’re still under .500 by the end of June.

This was the position they entered the offseason with — everyone is available! — but they ended up gearing up for one more push with the core of veterans they currently employ. It was not a bad move, I don’t think. With the exception of the Indians, the AL Central is mostly down, or at least appeared to be over the winter, with the Royals in decline and the Twins and White Sox seemingly a few years away from contention. The Twins, however, have been fantastic and the Tigers have mostly underachieved.

So we’re back to this. Which veterans the Tigers can reasonably unload, however, is an open question. J.D. Martinez is in his walk year, so while tradable, he may not bring back a big return. Guys like Justin Upton, Justin Verlander and Miguel Cabrera either have very large contracts or no-trade protection.

The end of June is still a while from now, of course, and while the Tigers are under .500, they’re only 4.5 games behind the Twins. But they had better turn it around or else it sounds like the front office is going to turn the page.

Must-Click Link: Remembering Eddie Grant the first major leaguer to die in combat

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As you get ready for Memorial Day weekend and whatever it entails for you and yours, take some time to read an excellent article from Mike Bates over at The Hardball Times.

The article is about Eddie Grant. You probably never heard of him. He was a journeyman infielder — often a backup — from 1905 through 1915. If you have heard of him, it was likely not for his baseball exploits, however: it was because he was the first active baseball player to die in combat, killed in the Battle of the Argonne Forest in October 1915.

Michael tells us about more than Grant’s death, however. He provides a great overview of his life and career. And notes that Grant didn’t even have to go to war if he didn’t want to. He was 34, had the chance to coach or manage and had a law degree and the potential to make a lot of money following his baseball career. He volunteered, however, for both patriotic and personal reasons. And it cost him his life.

Must-read stuff indeed. Especially this weekend.