Cameron 'willing to make a sacrifice' to stay in Milwaukee

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Impending free agent Mike Cameron said yesterday that he’d like to remain in Milwaukee beyond this season and “would be willing to make a sacrifice to make that happen.”
Cameron is earning $10 million this season and would fetch the Brewers draft-pick compensation as a Type B free agent if he leaves, although they’d have to offer him arbitration first and there’s some risk that he could accept. Of course, that would hardly be a horrible thing.
He turns 37 years old in a few months and not many center fielders remain effective defenders at that age, but the Brewers don’t have an obvious in-house replacement ready and he’s shown no signs of decline. Cameron has an OPS above .800 for the fourth time in five seasons and remains an excellent defensive center fielder, rating 8.6 runs above average according to Ultimate Zone Rating.
Fan Graphs shows Cameron as being 38.7 runs above replacement level this year, which is good for 15th in the NL and makes him a bargain at $10 million. And while being 37 puts him at high risk to decline suddenly, Cameron has aged far better than most players and was 40.3 runs above replacement level in 2008. If he’s truly willing to give the Brewers a discount to remain in Milwaukee, they could jump at the chance.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.