And That Happened: Sunday's scores and highlights

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Giants 9, Rockies 5: What a difference a week makes. Heck, not
even a week. Six days after the Rockies beat the Giants on a grand
slam, the Giants do it to the Rockies, courtesy of Edgar Renteria.
Given the Dodgers’ relatively uninteresting play lately, I think I’m
going to squint my eyes until the end of the season and pretend that
this is a bonafide pennant race as opposed to a wild card race.

Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 0: Papa-oom-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow-mow,
papa-oom-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow (6 IP, 3 H, 0 ER). Not that we
should be surprised. Byrd has always done well on 340 days rest.

Royals 3, Mariners 0: More dominance from Zack Greinke (CG, SHO
1 H). We can only hope that the writers are smart enough to realize
come awards voting time that Greinke’s win total is a function of his
team. Given the extremes involved here, I think they will. If he had
won 15-16 wins for a middling team like the Twins or the Brewers,
someone would be tempted to say that Greinke wasn’t a “winner.” That
many wins with a profoundly terrible Royals team will be viewed as a
positive rather than a negative. In other words, he’ll get the Steve
Carlton-in-72 vote.

Angels 9, Athletics 1: After the game, John Lackey talked about
how this Angels team compares to the 2002 team which won the World
Series and on which he made his debut: “Several guys on that ’02 team
will tell you we might not have been the best team, but we were hot . .
. That ’02 team was more of an offense-based team, for sure. We didn’t
pitch that well.” That’s so right. Except for the fact that the 2002
Angels were tied for the best ERA and allowed the fewest runs per game
in the American League.

Brewers 4, Pirates 1: Jeff Suppan won on his bobblehead day. In other news, there’s a Jeff Suppan bobblehead day.

Cardinals 2, Nationals 1: Adam Wainwright won on his bobblehead
day. This is somewhat more defensible. Though to be honest, I’d rather
have the Suppan, just for the sake of randomness.

Tigers 4, Rays 3: This is the kind of game the Rays were winning
a year ago. There’s not some magical explanation to it. The pendulum
just swings, ya know?

Mets 4, Cubs 1: Nelson Figueroa (7 IP, 6 H, 1 ER, 10K, RBI) was
a one man team. Really, it was just him, playing all nine positions
like Bugs Bunny vs. the Gashouse Gorillas because the rest of the Mets
are on the DL.

Twins 5, Rangers 3: The Twins scored three runs in the eighth
via a variety of unconventional means, after which Ron Gardenhire said
“We kind of knick-knacked them a little bit.” I think that means that
instead of being pummeled, the Rangers were Hummeld.

Yankees 8, White Sox 3: The Yankees keep winning, and because
they’re doing so well, they continue to mess with Joba Chamberlain,
yanking him after 35 pitches despite there being nothing wrong with
him. At the risk of sounding like one of those cranky old pitchers from
the 60s and 70s, I can’t help but think that Chamberlain is going to
turn out like that kid you knew whose parents would never let leave the
house growing up and then got alcohol poisoning the same week he went
away to college because he had no perspective or life experience. Sure,
you don’t want to let him kill himself now, but there are worse things
in the world than letting the boy pitch and get knocked around a bit.

Orioles 5, Indians 2: Brian Matusz has the best start of his
very, very young career, and spends a lot of time in the game story
talking about how he overcame his initial struggles with adjustments
and video and all of that. The fact that he was facing the Indians
didn’t hurt either.

Marlins 6, Padres 4: “It was a tough weekend for us and today
was nice to salvage the series,” Cody Ross said after the game. The
Padres took two of three. If they had lost the first one and won the
second two, no one on the Marlins would be talking about how the win on
Friday “salvaged the series.” Likewise, if they had won Saturday’s game
but lost on the bookends, no one would feel too good about things. I
use that phrase all the time, but games are games are games.

Dodgers 3, Reds 2: Dodgers pitchers combined to strike out 20
Reds. Nine of those Ks came in the 8th-12th innings, dooming
Cincinnati’s chances to get anything going. Clayton Kershaw still
hasn’t won a game since mid-July, despite the fact that he has a
sub-3.00 ERA since then.

Diamondbacks 4, Astros 3: Arizona won the game, but closer Chad
Qualls dislocated his kneecap on the last play of the game and will
probably be done for the year. I’m one of the more squeamish people I
know. Seriously, my daughter lost her first tooth a couple of weeks ago
and was out of commission for hours. But nothing makes me cringe more
than thinking about kneecap injuries. Really, it’s taken me ten minutes
to just write this individual recap out because I’ve been alternating
between mild nausea and frantic rubbing of my own kneecaps in an effort
to somehow make the horror of that kind of injury erase itself from my
thoughts.

Phillies 3, Braves 2: Games like this don’t make me feel too hot
either. First Chipper throws away the bunt in the seventh, and then
Garret Anderson just butchers the Carlos Ruiz “double” that put the
Phillies ahead for good. Continued failure to support Jurrjens. Just —
further failure. At times like these I have to remember that, for most
of the year anyway, I’ve been on the “2010 is the Braves’ year” train,
believing that the team brass was really thinking that too, even if
they could never admit it. I still think that’s right, but that little
hot streak earlier this month is the kind of thing that makes you
forget.

Orioles re-sign Michael Bourn to a minor league deal

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 04:  Michael Bourn #1 of the Baltimore Orioles hits a single in the fifth inning against the Toronto Blue Jays during the American League Wild Card game at Rogers Centre on October 4, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
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The Orioles have re-signed outfielder Michael Bourn to a minor league contract with an invitation to major league camp, MASN’s Roch Kubatko reports.

Bourn, 34, joined the Orioles last year in a trade from the Diamondbacks on August 31. Though he compiled a meager .669 OPS with the Diamondbacks, Bourn hit a solid .283/.358/.435 in 55 plate appearances with the O’s through the end of the season.

Bourn, a non-roster invitee to camp, will try to play his way onto the Orioles’ 25-man roster. If he does make the roster, Bourn will receive a $2 million salary, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports points out.

Shelby Miller is in the best mental shape of his life

PITTSBURGH, PA - MAY 24:  Shelby Miller #26 of the Arizona Diamondbacks pitches in the first inning during the game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park on May 24, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
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Diamondbacks starter Shelby Miller had about as bad a season as one can have. He was the headliner in the trade that sent 2015 No. 1 overall pick Dansby Swanson, All-Star outfielder Ender Inciarte, and highly-regarded pitching prospect Aaron Blair to the Braves. It was a trade that was pilloried at the time and continues to be pilloried to this day.

Miller didn’t do then-GM Dave Stewart any favors with his 2016 performance. He went 3-12 with a 6.15 ERA and a 70/42 K/BB ratio over 101 innings. That included a bout with mechanical failure, as he kept hitting the mound with his follow-through. He went on the disabled list. And after that, he was demoted to Triple-A. After getting fired, Stewart expressed remorse over acquiring Miller — or, more accurately, giving up Swanson to do so.

So, the 26-year-old Miller heads into 2017 without any momentum. To his credit, though, he’s going into the new season with a very positive perspective. Via Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports:

I’m just in a really happy place, away from the field, on the field. […]

Maybe it’s just the way I go about everything, trying to be positive in every single aspect of life. Baseball’s not perfect. I’m not perfect. I know bumps in the road are going to happen. Last year was obviously not just a bump, but a huge mountain. Right now, that’s completely behind me. I’m not worried about any of that.

I’m really ready for this year, ready to redeem myself so much.

Even pitching coach Mike Butcher sees the change in Miller’s mentality. “He’s not a different guy. But you can see there’s a presence in him. That’s what we need. Just be Shelby Miller. You don’t have to live up to anything. Just be yourself.”

Manager Torey Lovullo, too, praised Miller. “I saw a guy who had spent a lot of time taking care of his business in the weight room — he looks fantastic, in fantastic shape,” he said.

It sounds like Miller is not only in great mental shape, but great physical shape, too. Is it the “best shape of his life”? Only time can tell.