And That Happened: Thursday's scores and highlights

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White Sox 9, Red Sox 5: Who needs Billy Wagner when you have
Nick Green? The shortstop pitches two shutout innings. That’s a huge
increase in the number of innings he’s thrown over last year, but don’t
worry: Since he’s over 25, the Verducci Effect probably doesn’t come into play.  By the way, I just love that picture. In it he’s actually throwing over to first, but it kind of looks like those old photos of deadball-era pitchers just hurling it up there without really putting their whole body into it.

Dodgers 3, Rockies 2: Vicente Padilla. Who knew? Nothing special
of course — two runs on six hits over five — but that’s a few fewer
hits and runs than you might have expected him to give up. This series
— and what came before and after it — represents everything fantastic
about baseball. The Rockies took three of four from the Giants and won
one in dramatic fashion against L.A. 48 hours ago. Then bam, bam,
they’re four games out and have to go to San Francisco and face Tim
Lincecum, a resurgent Barry Zito and Matt Cain. They could end the week
way worse off than they started it, and no one could have expected it
as late as Wednesday afternoon. It’s a relentless season that gives no
quarter. You can’t pump yourself up once a week or ride a hot hand.
Twenty-five guys have to go out there every single day and do it. It
actually makes exercises like these daily recaps rather silly, as the
true story of the season can only truly be seen from a distance. The
true mettle of a team revealed in its skills at long term survival.

Diamondbacks 11, Giants 0: Then again, maybe the Rockies don’t have much to worry about this weekend.

Pirates 3, Phillies 2: So your first closer blows one, and your
second closer blows one again the next night. Now what do you do? Well,
you can leave your starter out there the whole game, which is what
Charlie Manuel did with J.A. Happ last night. That didn’t work either
as Happ gives up two in the eighth, so now it looks like the Phils are
on to Plan D. Say, I wonder what would it take to pry Nick Green away
from Boston . . .

Braves 9, Padres 1: Atlanta salvages one behind seven shutout
innings by Javier Vazquez, who had an RBI to boot. Nine runs and
seventeen hits for the Braves, but the only extra-base hit was Adam
LaRoche’s homer in the sixth. Otherwise, it was single-fest.

Nationals 5, Cubs 4: Milton Bradley was 0 for 5, and is in a big
slump. I have no idea if Cubs fans actually hate him like he thinks
they do, but if they don’t already, he’s giving them ample reason. The
Cubs are now nine behind St. Louis. “Look, let’s just win some baseball
games. Forget the Cardinals and every other team,” said Lou Piniella
after the game. As long as that includes the Cubs, I think everyone is
on board.

Astros 4, Cardinals 3: Jeff Keppinger hit what would prove to be
the winning homer with two out in the ninth, averting a sweep by the
Cards. Nice rally, however small, the day after Oswalt said the team
was “dead.” Then again, maybe Oswalt didn’t really mean the team was
dead. I always have taken comments like that to be the way players
communicate their general unhappiness with the manager to the press and
team brass.

Indians 5, Royals 4: Andy Marte homered, tripled and drove in a
couple. He’s still no great shakes on the year, but he’s on a warmish
streak of late. If he keeps it up, he may actually be given one final
chance to be an all-season everyday starter in 2010. Because he’s a
former Braves prospect — and because I fear that the concept of being
a AAAA player extends to other walks of life beyond baseball and I thus
want to see it debunked out of fear and anxiety — I’m kind of rooting
for him to make it.

Rangers 7, Yankees 2: The team whose starter struck out 12 dudes
in six innings lost, and the team whose starter walked seven in 3.2 IP
won. That makes sense.

Reds 8, Brewers 5: Nothing I can say can beat the storylines as told by the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinal. First, Tom Haudricourt’s game story
starts like this: “It was another discouraging day at Miller Park on
Thursday as the Brewers ended a discouraging series in what has become
a discouraging second half.” The headline to Michael Hunt’s column puts
it more succinctly: “Another dank day of despair for our ’09 Brewers.” I’m guessing they’ve all turned their attention to the Badgers and Pack by now.

Mets 10, Marlins 3: Day games in Miami in August make total
sense. The box score says that there over 12,000 paid to see this game,
but based on the crowd shots I saw, there couldn’t have been half that.
Which raises a philosophical question: if the Mets get 17 hits and no
one was there to see it, did it really happen?

Athletics 2, Angels 0: Trevor Cahill threw two-hit shutout ball
over seven innings and Mike Wuertz and Andrew Bailey shut out the
Angels for the remaining two innings. This is bizarre: “The Angels’
uniformed personnel and front office staff assembled in center field
before batting practice for the 2009 team photo, but RHP Jered Weaver
missed because he was home with the flu. So PR guy Eric Kay stood in
wearing Weaver’s No. 36 jersey, and the pitcher’s head will be
superimposed when it is printed.” What happens if, say, Juan Rivera
screws up something really bad in a playoff game that costs the team
the season. Do they airbrush him out like Stalin did with purged
political enemies? Because the possibilities here seem limitless.

Orioles have reached out to Yovani Gallardo

Yovani Gallardo
AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez
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From Jon Heyman of CBS Sports comes word that the Orioles “like” free agent starter Yovani Gallardo and “have reached out to him” to gauge his interest in coming to Baltimore and what that might cost.

Gallardo rejected a one-year, $15.8 million qualifying offer from the Rangers earlier this month and so his free agency is tied to draft pick compensation, but that shouldn’t hurt his bottom line all that much.

The 29-year-old right-hander posted a solid 3.42 ERA in 184 1/3 innings (33 starts) this past season for Texas and he pitched well in his one ALDS start.

Heyman reported a few weeks ago that the Diamondbacks are interested, and the Cubs, Blue Jays, and Dodgers were tied to him just ahead of the July 31 trade deadline.

Cubs, Cardinals, Giants, Dodgers, and Red Sox all showing serious interest in David Price

AP Photo/Tim Donnelly

David Price has expressed a desire to return to Toronto, where he finished out the 2015 season, but FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal writes Wednesday that the Blue Jays “are not expected to be a major factor in his free agency.”

The teams that should be considered serious suitors, per Rosenthal, are the Cubs, Cardinals, Giants, Dodgers, and Red Sox — all deep-pocketed teams looking to contend in 2016. Money is apparently the issue for the Blue Jays, who are currently owned by Rogers Communications.

Price registered an outstanding 2.45 ERA, 1.076 WHIP, and 225/47 K/BB ratio in 220 1/3 innings (32 starts) this past season between the Tigers and Jays, finishing second in the American League Cy Young Award race behind Dallas Keuchel of the Astros.

The 30-year-old left-hander is probably looking for a six- or seven-year contract worth more than $25 million per season. He is represented by agent Bo McKinnis.

Marlins have begun extension talks with Dee Gordon

Dee Gordon
AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald wrote three weeks ago that the Marlins were probably going to explore an extension this winter with second baseman Dee Gordon. And it sounds like those talks are underway.

Via beat writer Joe Frisaro of

As a guest on MLB Network’s “Hot Stove” show Wednesday morning, Gordon confirmed his camp has been in talks with the Marlins regarding a multiyear deal. A source told that the discussions are preliminary and have just recently started.

“My agent is doing the talking,” Gordon said on the show. “They’re just keeping me in the loop. I think it’s going pretty well right now. We’ll see how that goes. I’m just playing the waiting game. We’re going to do the right thing.”

The 27-year-old carries three more seasons of salary arbitration, so there’s no real rush to get something done before next spring. Gordon carries quite a bit of leverage after posting a career-best .333/.359/.418 slash line in 145 games this past season for the Fish. He led all major leaguers in hits (205) and stolen bases (58).

Braves sign Bud Norris to one-year contract

Bud Norris

Bud Norris has found a home for his attempt at a bounceback season, signing a one-year deal with the Braves. Jon Heyman of says it’s worth $2.5 million, which is a huge cut from his $8.8 million salary this year.

Norris had established himself as a solid mid-rotation starter from 2009-2014, but had a brutal 2015 season split between the Orioles and Padres with a 6.72 ERA in 83 innings and a late-season move to the bullpen.

In announcing the signing the Braves referred to Norris as a starting pitcher, so joining the rotation for a rebuilding team gives him a chance to get his career back on track with an eye on hitting the open market as a free agent again next offseason. And if he fares well, the Braves could use him to add a prospect or two at the trade deadline.