And Now we turn to the leakers

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Jonathan Littman at Yahoo! has been all over the steroids cases for years. Yesterday he reported that I’m not some lone nut out there wondering when people are going to start taking the leaks of the 2003 list seriously:

 

“This makes the leaks so much more troubling,” said Charles La Bella, a former U. S. attorney and chief of the criminal division for the Southern District of California who now practices criminal defense in San Diego. “The information shouldn’t have been seized. People have been unfairly tainted by something the courts have ruled should never have been made public.

“My guess is that somebody somewhere has to be looking at this as a leak investigation.”

But who’s doing the leaking?  No one is willing to openly speculate, but there are two passages in Littman’s piece which make me wonder if someone is trying to send a message about it all:

Peters said that a list of players who tested positive was created only after the government’s illegal search.

“Everyone talks of this list, like there was a list [of players who tested positive],” he said. “There was a spreadsheet [at the testing lab that contained every test result]. The government created a list, which it tried to disseminate.”

and

As for the consequences of the illegal search, Peters said he doesn’t know who committed the leaks. But he does have an idea of who created and printed the two- to three-page list of players who tested positive, the list that was circulated among at least a handful of attorneys and that resulted in the leaks.

“I have a strong suspicion the list was created by Novitzky,” he said.

Given that the illegal search could very well have been motivated to snag as many players up in this as possible, it would certainly make sense that a government lawyer or agent is doing the leaking.  That said, it’s probably worth remembering that there are a lot more people than merely the government folks who had access.

The league, the union, individual players and possibly other interested parties had representation in this long, drawn out case, and any number of those lawyers could have access to the list.  What’s more, we have to remember that it’s not a given that the leaks are motivated by a desire to out players as such.  Money could be a motivator. So too could spite or some personal reasons that have very little to do with baseball or steroids in the first place.  Remember Deep Throat? The most famous leaker in history was motivated primarily by his anger at being stepped over for a job.

Whoever it is, however, should be sleeping a little less soundly now that folks are openly speculating about his or her identity and making noises about flushing them out.  And that’s a very good thing.

Freddie Freeman extends hitting streak to 30 games

ATLANTA, GA - SEPTEMBER 17: Freddie Freeman #5 of the Atlanta Braves waits to bat in the fifth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on September 17, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Daniel Shirey/Getty Images)
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Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman extended his hitting streak to 30 games with a single to center field in the bottom of the sixth inning of Wednesday night’s win against the Phillies. Prior to that at-bat, he had grounded out, been hit by a pitch, and walked.

Freeman entered Wednesday night batting .382/.477/.673 with 11 doubles, seven home runs, 27 RBI, and 24 runs scored over his past 29 games. Though his numbers are lacking compared to National League MVP Award favorite Kris Bryant, Freeman will get some top-five votes. On the season, he entered Wednesday hitting .307/.404/.576 with 33 home runs, 88 RBI, and 99 runs scored in 673 plate appearances.

Freeman’s 30-game hitting streak is the longest such streak in the majors this season, according to ESPN Stats & Info. He has also reached base safely in 46 consecutive games.

If Mets clinch Wild Card spot, Noah Syndergaard to be limited to 25 pitches on Sunday

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 13:  Noah Syndergaard #34 of the New York Mets pitches in the third inning against the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park on September 13, 2016 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Greg Fiume/Getty Images)
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Mets manager Terry Collins has been scheming out his rotation for the final few days of the season. As ESPN’s Adam Rubin reports, Bartolo Colon may start on short rest against the Phillies on Friday since he threw just 47 pitches in Monday’s loss to the Marlins.

Collins also said that if the Mets clinch a Wild Card spot prior to Sunday’s game against the Phillies, Noah Syndergaard will be limited to only 25 pitches in his start. He would then start the Wild Card game for the Mets. If Syndergaard is needed to pitch a full game against the Phillies, it sounds like Colon would start the Wild Card game, though Collins did not specify.

The Mets are limping to the finish line, having lost five starters in Steven Matz, Jacob deGrom Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler, and Jon Niese. They’ve also withstood injuries to David Wright, Wilmer Flores, Neil Walker, and Lucas Duda.