And That Happened: Wednesday's scores and highlights

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Dodgers 6, Rockies 1: Randy Wolf (7.1 IP, 5 H, 1 ER) and Andre Either (3-4, 2 HR, 3 RBI) put this one away pretty early, thereby preventing me from being able to use the second in a series of choke jokes I had prepared. There’s still a lot of time left in the season, however, and I’m sure the occasion will present itself again.

Phillies 4, Pirates 1: All day yesterday people were saying “Forget Lidge, bring in Ryan Madson! Madson can get the job done!” Guess not, as Madson’s blown save cost Cole Hamels his first win in a month despite pitching eight shutout innings. Best part: Madson gets the W! Which means that he’s a winner. QED. At least that’s what Joe Morgan taught me. Anyway, Ryan Howard saves everyone’s bacon with a three-run homer in the 10th. Mmmm . . . bacon.

Marlins 5, Mets 3: This Mets team is so depleted that the very concept of depletion is insulted by being associated with them. The latest DL resident is Oliver Perez, who was sidelined with a season-ending knee injury. While is absence would seem like just what the doctor ordered, the Mets were still somehow lost this one.

Red Sox 3, White Sox 2: A walkoff homer for Big Papi, who homered earlier in the game as well. In fact four of the game’s five runs came on solo home runs. Tim Wakefield made his first start since the All-Star break, and pitched well despite not getting the win (7 IP, 6 H, 1 ER). Victor Martinez did his best to catch the knuckler, though the first pitch of the game did get away from him. The late Senator Edward Kennedy was honored before the game with a solemn ceremony and “Taps” and all of that. With all due respect to the recently departed, however, don’t you think he would much rather have been honored by the allowance of beer sales past the seventh inning?

Padres 12, Braves 5: This is basically the Braves we’ve been living with for the past four years: Awful play out of the gate, a nice little run to give you hope, and then an inexplicable swoon in games a contending team has no business losing. Mac calls the 6th-9th innings “the worst four innings that the Braves have played this year . . . probably the worst anyone has played.” Another tragic thing about this game, courtesy of reader Melissa D: Jerry Springer sang “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.” Melissa does point out one ray of light: the Turner Field organist continues to dazzle, playing “Papa Don’t Preach” each time Tony Gwynn, Jr. came to bat. I’m guessing it’s only a matter of time before this organist is punched out cold by an angry player. Which I hope is something he would view as a very, very worthy goal.

Cardinals 3, Astros 2: The scary thing about all of this is that the guy who is 13-9 with a 3.11 ERA is only this Cardinal team’s third best starter. Pineiro gave up two runs over eight innings pitched, and without looking, I’m going to guess that the Cardinals have won more close, low-scoring games than any team in baseball this year. Seriously, I’ve recapped around 100 Cardinals games this year, and I’m pretty sure that 92% of them finished 3-2.

Orioles 5, Twins 1: His team lost, but Alexi Casilla made a humdinger of a play, ranging right, diving to snag the ball, and then flipping it out of his glove to Orlando Cabrera covering second for the out as Casilla face planted. Also, I was not aware that the Twins have a pitcher named Jeff Manship, which is perhaps the coolest last name in the world. I’d lose the “Jeff” though, and go with something like “Jack” or “Brock” or “Pud.” Seriously, tell me that “Pud Manship” wouldn’t be your favorite player. See, now I know you’re lying.

Blue Jays 3, Rays 2: Rod Barajas ties it up with a ninth inning homer off of J.P. Howell. Howell was apparently the only relief pitcher the Rays brought with them on this road trip, as he was allowed to stay in to issue three straight walks and then a wild pitch which allowed Marco Scutaro to score the winning run. Bad day for the home plate umpires, as first Jerry Crawford was knocked out of the game in the third after he was hit by a foul ball to the face, and then his replacement, Tom Hallion, left in the sixth inning after taking one off the chest. Hallion manshipped up, however, and stayed in the game over at third base following a delay in play, with Brian O’Nora moving behind the plate. Sadly, O’Nora was stampeded by wild buffalo in the eighth, but by then I think everyone knew it was coming.

Cubs 9, Nationals 4: Livan Hernadez made his first start on his second tour of duty with the Nats, but the final score wasn’t his doing. He actually pitched pretty well (6 IP, 5 H, 2 ER). It was the bullpen — mostly Jorge “how in the hell do I still have a job in baseball” Sosa — that did Washington in. Milton Bradley had three RBI, but make no mistake: he still feels your hatred.



Yankees 9, Rangers 2: The Yankees win this one easily behind a
nice outing from Pettitte and a three-run homer from Posada. The
Rangers are now two and a half behind Boston for the wild card, which
kind of bums me out, because I think they’d be fun to watch in the
playoffs, whereas Boston is the opposite of fun to watch.

Indians 4, Royals 2: I have mornings when I can’t find anything
interesting to talk about in a given game. AP game story writers have
nights like those too: “Most of the game was nondescript, as might be
expected of two teams with little left to play for and a crowd that
hardly seemed there . . . Lots of lazy popups, routine grounders, a few
strikeouts, the occasional grounder through the infield. Boring? Maybe
a little, especially after what Greinke did the night before, but it
worked.”

Angels 4, Tigers 2: Vladimir Guerrero got his 1,000th hit as an
Angel. Seven other guys have done that: Garret Anderson, Tim Salmon,
Brian Downing, Darin Erstad, Jim Fregosi, Bobby Grich and Chone
Figgins. Before looking that up I tried to guess the other seven. I got
five right, forgetting Fregosi for some reason that probably has to do
with me being too young to remember him as a player, and Figgins, who
for some reason I still tell myself is, like, 24 and just got called up
a year ago, even though I know better.

Reds 4, Brewers 3: You don’t hear nearly as much about Ryan
Braun’s defensive deficiencies these days as you used to, but once in a
while we do get a reminder that, for all of his merits as a ballplayer,
he can be a liability out in left. Such a reminder came when
Pinch-hitter Darnell McDonald hit a liner over Braun’s head in the 10th
inning which he misjudged, allowing Craig Tatum to score. It’s a
testament to the Reds’ season by the way, that I had not heard of
either McDonald nor Tatum before this morning. A greater testament,
however, comes in connection with the Brewers’ season: 19 of the their
22 losses since the break have come to teams that are currently under
.500.

Giants 4, Diamondbacks 3: Benjie Molina hit a pinch hit
three-run home run in the eighth. Good game for Jonathan Sanchez, who
went seven innings giving up three runs and six hits while striking out
nine.

Mariners 5, Athletics 3: Seattle sweeps Oakland despite not
having Ichiro available. Surprisingly, they’re 9-2 without him this
year so, like, they should totally trade him to Atlanta for cash
considerations or something.


The Padres non-tendered RHP Tyson Ross

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 04:  Tyson Ross #38 of the San Diego Padres walks off the field as he's taken out of the game in the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers on opening day at PETCO Park on April 4, 2016 in San Diego, California.  (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
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Per a report by MLB.com’s AJ Cassavell, the Padres non-tendered right-handed starter Tyson Ross on Friday, cutting loose their top ace after three seasons with the club.

Ross, 29, was sidelined for the bulk of the season with inflammation in his right shoulder and underwent thoracic outlet surgery in October. His injuries limited him to only 5 1/3 innings in 2016, during which he gave up seven runs and struck out five in a 15-0 blowout against the Dodgers.

Prior to his lengthy stint on the disabled list, the right-hander earned 9.5 fWAR and pitched to a 3.07 ERA and 9.2 K/9 rate in three full seasons with the Padres. He avoided arbitration with a one-year, $9.625 million deal prior to the 2016 season after leading the league with 33 starts and delivering a 3.26 ERA and career-best 4.4 WARP over 196 innings in 2015.

The Padres appear open to bringing Ross back to San Diego, reported Cassavell, albeit not at such a steep cost. Cassavell quoted Padres’ GM A.J. Preller, who was reportedly in trade talks involving Ross but unable to strike a deal, likely due to the right-hander’s recent health issues. Preller denied that those same health issues factored into the club’s decision to non-tender their ace.

With the move, Ross became one of 35 major leaguers to enter free agency on Friday.

Angels’ Pujols has foot surgery, could be sidelined 4 months

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ANAHEIM, Calif. — Los Angeles Angels slugger Albert Pujols had surgery on his right foot Friday, possibly sidelining him past opening day.

Angels general manager Billy Eppler said Pujols had the procedure Friday in North Carolina to release his plantar fascia, the ligament connecting the heel to the toes. The three-time NL MVP was bothered by plantar fasciitis repeatedly during the season, but played through the pain in arguably the strongest year of his half-decade with the Angels.

Eppler said the surgery typically prevents players from participating in baseball activities for three months, along with another month before they’re ready to resume playing in games. Opening day for Los Angeles is April 3, and the Angels hope Pujols can be ready.

“He’s at that point in his career where he’s keenly aware of what’s happening with his body,” Eppler said in a phone interview. “I don’t put the timetable on Albert like you would with your younger players. We’ll just see in Albert’s case, as he progresses, what his timetable is.”

Pujols, who turns 37 next month, batted .268 last year with 31 homers and 119 RBIs, the fourth-most in the majors – although his .780 OPS was among the worst of his career. He largely served as a designated hitter instead of playing first base due to problems with his hamstrings and feet.

Pujols heads into 2017 with 591 career homers, ranking him ninth in major league history. He is 18 homers behind Sammy Sosa for eighth place.

After playing in pain until the final week of the Angels’ disappointing season, Pujols began shock wave therapy on his foot early in the offseason, believing he wouldn’t need surgery.

But Pujols’ foot became more painful in recent weeks despite the therapy, and he huddled with the Angels’ top brass to decide on surgery after his most recent trip to see Dr. Robert Anderson in North Carolina. Continuing with conservative care would have required 10 more weeks, forcing Pujols to miss the first half of the 2017 season if he still required surgery.

“He just felt that the pain had gotten to a point where he was comfortable” having surgery, Eppler said. “If we did delay it, you’re just looking at 2 1/2 more months into the season.”

Pujols had a different type of surgery on his right foot last winter, but recovered in time for opening day. He also had plantar fasciitis in his left foot during the 2013 season, eventually forcing him out for the year when his fascia snapped.

Pujols has five years and $140 million remaining on the 10-year, $240 million free-agent contract that pried him out of St. Louis, where he won two World Series and became a nine-time NL All-Star.

The Angels haven’t won a playoff game since Pujols’ arrival and Mike Trout‘s concurrent emergence as one of baseball’s best players. They went 74-88 last season, the injury-plagued club’s worst record since 1999.