Potent quotables: Rice says he was 'misquoted'

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“Anybody who
reads that story knows I wasn’t talking about Jeter or Rodriguez. Look
at them. Do you see any baggy pants? Do you see any dreadlocks?”




– Hall-of-Famer Jim Rice says that just because you mention someone’s name doesn’t necessarily mean you are talking about them.



“That could be
part of it. I should have won the MVP that year, by the way. There was
a trial. I took responsibility for my participation in it. That
happened 24 years ago. And along with that, you’ve got the steroid
issue now. Baseball and the United States are supposed to be two
forgiving entities — why haven’t they forgiven me? Deal with me for
what I’ve done and for my numbers and just forgive. In ’75, my first
year as a regular (starter), people started identifying me as one of
the best players in the game, and then later on as the best player. If
the media can do that, they should be able to look at me and look at my
numbers and say, ‘This guy is a Hall-of-Famer.'”




– Speaking of the Hall of Fame, Dave Parker thinks his drug use is keeping him out.



“There were a
couple of heaters (when) I felt that I should have thrown a hook. I
step off and re-gather and that’s when the non-executed pitch came.
(Posada) calls fine back there. It’s just a matter of me throwing what
I want to throw. There’s no pattern there. I’ve had a great run now
with Jorge. So there’s no fingers to point but at me.”




– A.J. Burnett, who was visibly irritated in Saturday’s 14-1 loss to the Red Sox, denies any rift with his catcher Jorge Posada.



“Koozie’s the only guy who ever saw it. Maybe that’s Koozie’s urban myth.”



– Ron Swoboda comments on Jerry Koosman’s admission
that he was the one who rubbed the baseball on his shoe in Game 5 of
the 1969 World Series, granting Cleon Jones first base on a hit by
pitch. The Mets eventually defeated the Orioles 5-3, shocking the
baseball universe with their improbable World Series victory.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.