Link-O-Rama: Maddon says Ed Hardy was so 2008

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* Earlier this week I made a joke about Joe Maddon dying his hair black to go with his trademark hipster glasses, noting that “earrings, Ed Hardy t-shirts, and a tribal tattoo could be next for the 55-year-old Rays manager.” Turns out, he already went through the Ed Hardy t-shirt phase last year!
* Shockingly, a retired former major leaguer thinks that things were better when he played. In related news, elderly people don’t like children playing on their lawns and most people who’re older than you had to walk five miles in the snow to school every morning when they were kids.
* After being designated for assignment by the Mets yesterday Livan Hernandez has now played for five teams in four seasons while posting ERAs of 4.83, 4.93, 6.05, and 5.47. He also turns 35 years old soon. Odds that he’ll sign with another team and end up in their rotation? Probably not as bad as you’d think, at least judging from the last half-dozen years of Sidney Ponson’s career.
* It’s been quite a fall for Chris Duncan, who was released yesterday by the Red Sox just a month after they acquired him in the Julio Lugo trade. Duncan had a .952 OPS as a 25-year-old rookie in 2006, but since then his yearly OPS totals are .834, .711, and .687. And that doesn’t even count his horrible .549 mark at Triple-A following the trade.
* Stephen Strasburg met his public this afternoon. They liked him.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: