Don't fix the draft, get rid of it

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strasburg.jpgIn the wake of Stephen Strasburg snagging a record $15 million contract from the Washington Nationals, there has been a lot of talk lately of what is wrong with the draft, and how it should be fixed.

From Bud Selig’s threats of seeking a hard slotting system, to the Rays being accused of not even trying to sign their first-round pick, the post-Strasburg drama has been a bit of a mess.

One particularly interesting idea, however, comes from Dave Cameron over at Fangraphs.

His plan? Abolish the draft completely.

Instead of including international players in the draft, as Selig would like to do, Cameron would make everyone a free agent. On the surface, that sounds like insanity (how would the Royals ever beat out the Yankees for a star player?), but in Cameron’s proposal, money from revenue sharing (roughly $200 million this season) would be allocated for amateur signings. The money would be divvied up on a graduated scale based on where the teams placed in the standings.

For example, the top five teams would only be allowed to spend $2 million each on amateurs, while the bottom five would be given $12 million apiece.

The top tier teams who have been winning recently would receive small sums of money that would essentially take them out of the running for the premium talents. Given that the teams that finished in the bottom half would likely be willing to bid ~60-70% of their budgets on the top guys available, the Strasburgs of the world would probably command bonuses in the $7 or $8 million range, which the winning teams would not be able to match.

Pretty interesting idea. Give each team a budget, with the bad teams having more money to spend than the good teams. In turn, you hold down the bonus money given to unproven amateurs, and you create and even playing field for high school, college and foreign kids.

Just might be crazy enough to work.

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If you Twitter, and feel like burning your draft card, you can follow me at @Bharks.

No structural damage found in Andrew Benintendi’s knee

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - AUGUST 24:  Shortstop Matt Duffy #5 of the Tampa Bay Rays tags out Andrew Benintendi #40 of the Boston Red Sox after Dustin Pedroia grounded into the double play  during the seventh inning of a game on August 24, 2016 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Good news in Boston: An MRI on Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi‘s left knee revealed no structural damage.

Benintendi slipped while trying to avoid a tag at second base, injuring his leg, but it appears he’s avoided a serious injury. A timetable for his return isn’t known at this point, but the Red Sox expect to get him back before the end of the season.

Benintendi is hitting .324/.365/.485 with a homer and ten RBI in 21 games.

Carlos Ruiz leaves a goodbye note for the Phillies

CLEARWATER, FL - FEBRUARY 26:  Carlos Ruiz #51 of the Philadelphia Phillies poses for a portrait on February 26, 2016 at Bright House Field in Clearwater, Florida.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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And then there was one. One player from the 2008 World Series champs, that is. Ryan Howard likely isn’t going anywhere so he’ll be the last one to turn the lights off, but today Carlo Ruiz bid adieu to the Phillies following his trade to Los Angeles.

Lost in all of the emotions the Dodgers are reported to be feeling about A.J. Ellis leaving is the fact that Ruiz was one of the most beloved Phillies players ever, by both his teammates and their fans. Yesterday Roy Halladay penned a heartfelt goodbye to Ruiz, suggesting that he was every bit as essential to his and the Phillies’ success as Ellis has been to Clayton Kershaw (and in pure baseball production, obviously, quite more).

Today Chooch left a message for his now former teammates: