Daily Dose: Now closing, Carlos Marmol

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Carlos Marmol was the most dominant reliever in baseball last year, yet Lou Piniella went with Kevin Gregg at closer to begin the season. Five months later Marmol has issued 52 walks and plunked 11 batters in 56.1 innings, yet Piniella handed him the closer job Tuesday after Gregg predictably struggled while posting a 4.47 ERA and blowing six saves in 29 chances.
Marmol has been nowhere near as good as he was last season because he’s rarely been able to throw the ball over the plate consistently, but remains extremely difficult to hit with 10.7 strikeouts per nine innings and a .163 opponents’ batting average. He’ll obviously need to stop walking a batter per inning to have success, but he’s just as clearly the Cubs’ best bet for a shutdown guy and Gregg was miscast in the role.
While the Cubs make the correct decision about 120 games too late, here are some other notes from around baseball …


* Texas’ vaunted catching depth has been a bust this year, as Jarrod Saltalamacchia and Taylor Teagarden have combined for a .664 OPS and Max Ramirez has missed time with a wrist injury at Triple-A. Saltalamacchia is now on the disabled list with an arm injury, so the Rangers’ search for help behind the plate brought them back to the greatest catcher in team history, Ivan Rodriguez.
For the cost of two marginal prospects the Astros sent Rodriguez back to where his Hall of Fame career began, but unfortunately for the Rangers he’s just a shell of his old self at the age of 37. Rodriguez’s numbers at the plate are almost identical to the poor totals posted by Texas catchers and he’s expected to merely split starts down the stretch with Teagarden. Not a bad stop-gap pickup, but don’t expect much.
* Having suppressed his service time long enough to push back arbitration and free agency, the Blue Jays recalled Travis Snider from the minors Tuesday. Snider had a modest .736 OPS in 188 plate appearances during previous stints in Toronto, but the 21-year-old has big-time power potential after blasting 33 homers and 39 doubles in 164 games between Double-A and Triple-A. Avoiding tons of strikeouts will be key.
* Speaking of suppressing service time, the Royals sent Alex Gordon to Triple-A on Tuesday despite the fact that the 25-year-old has logged 1,281 plate appearances spread over 314 games in the majors and we’re two weeks from rosters expanding. Gordon has hit just .227/.310/.333 in 22 games since returning from hip surgery, but it seems obvious that the move was made to push back his eventual free agency.
AL Quick Hits: Justin Morneau sat out Tuesday’s game with an inner-ear infection and Jason Kubel exited early after fouling a ball off his leg … Felix Hernandez threw seven innings of one-run ball Tuesday before the bullpen blew what would’ve been his 13th win … Dustin Pedroia has left the Red Sox to be with his wife for the birth of their first child … Jake Peavy allowed three runs over four innings in a rehab start Tuesday at Triple-A … Aubrey Huff made his Tigers debut batting fifth and playing designated hitter Tuesday … Meanwhile, the Orioles replaced Aubrey Huff by calling up former top prospect Michael Aubrey from Triple-A … Joe Saunders (shoulder) is unlikely come off the disabled list when eligible Sunday … Anthony Swarzak will start Thursday with Brian Duensing pitching Saturday following Francisco Liriano’s trip to the DL.
NL Quick Hits: Stephen Strasburg isn’t expected to make his big-league debut this season … Conor Jackson’s rehab assignment has been put on hold following more complications from valley fever … General manager Doug Melvin admitted Tuesday that the Brewers are “working on something” for Bill Hall … Gaby Sanchez is back with the Marlins after getting just two at-bats during his previous call-up … Johnny Cueto is still listed as Friday’s starter despite indications that he’d be skipped in the rotation … Chris Young is hoping to be ready for spring training after having surgery Monday to shave fraying in his labrum … Nick Johnson (hamstring) was out of the lineup again Tuesday and expects to miss several more games … Mike Hampton was placed on the disabled list Tuesday with a strained shoulder … Carlos Gonzalez batted leadoff Tuesday, with Dexter Fowler moving to the second spot … Ubaldo Jimenez tossed eight innings of one-run ball Tuesday for his fifth straight win.

Who should win the manager of the year awards? Who Will?

PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 15:  Manager Dave Roberts #30 of the Los Angeles Dodgers looks on from the dougout during the seventh inning of a MLB game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field on July 15, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Ralph Freso/Getty Images)
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With the regular season ending on Sunday and most of the playoff spots locked up, there’s really only one big thing left to argue about: postseason awards. So let’s spend some time looking at who should win each of the four major awards and who will win them. Which are often totally different things. Next up: The Manager of the Year Awards

The Manager of the Year Award is pretty dumb. Numbers aren’t everything in any award, but there are literally zero numbers that gauge a manager’s effectiveness or performance apart from wins and losses and wins and losses are mostly a function of talent on the roster, for which the manager is not responsible. This is not to say managers aren’t important. Of course they are! They make important decisions every day and keep the clubhouse running smoothly and that’s important. It just so happens to be unquantifiable and subject to anecdote and projection.

For instance, Matt Williams won the Manager of the Year Award with he Nationals in 2014. He was run out of town on a rail in 2015. Did he suddenly forget how to manage? Or did he never really know but was blessed with good fortune and better players the year before?

Joe Maddon won the award last year, in large part because the Cubs outperformed expectations. This year the Cubs are the best team around. But everyone expected them to be because of all that talent! Does that mean that Maddon’s 2015 award was fraudulent? The product of poor expectations assessment on behalf of the media? At the same time, there’s a pretty strong vibe that he won’t win it this year, so are we to say that winning between 101 and 104 games is . . . a worse job than last year? Don’t even get me started on arguments that Bruce Bochy somehow became a lesser manager this year, because I suspect — and bear with me on this — something else is going on with the Giants.

Manager of the Year has always been about narratives and expectations of people on the outside looking in who nonetheless purport to know how the manager performed his job in the most inside baseball kinds of ways. It’s poppycock. It may as well be the Golden Globes.

So, rather than just break it down the way we did the other awards, let’s just thrown this out like the big mess that it is:

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Bill and Ashley say that Terry Francona should be the American League Manager of the Year. Bill’s reasoning: “The Indians went essentially the whole year without Michael Brantley and their pitching staff imploded in September. Francona deserves a lot of credit for holding the team together.”

Hey, works for me too! Let’s give it to Tito. Even if we can tell a compelling story about John Farrell and the Red Sox and even if Jeff Banister, the reigning AL Manager of the Year, improved by anywhere from 6-9 games in the standings this year over last in a division most people thought the Astros would win.

 

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Bill says Dusty Baker, arguing that “The Nationals had all kinds of bullpen issues and Stephen Strasburg wasn’t able to pitch the final two months of the season. They could’ve easily folded but they didn’t, and I think that’s a reflection on Baker.”

Ashley says Dave Roberts. She didn’t give me her reasoning, but I bet she’d agree with me if I said “The Nationals Dodgers had all kinds of bullpen rotation issues and Stephen Strasburg Clayton Kershaw wasn’t able to pitch for two months of the season. They could’ve easily folded but they didn’t, and I think that’s a reflection on Baker Roberts.” You could throw in some stuff about how Yasiel Puig was managed by Roberts (i.e. better, though his come-to-Jesus demotion may have been the front office’s doing). I think I’ll go with Roberts, simply because I feel like it’d be bad precedent to give it to a Nationals manager every even numbered year simply because that dang franchise is inconsistent.

What about the Cubs? Here’s Bill again:

I considered Joe Maddon of the Cubs, but the team was so good I think the Cubs could’ve had a kitten manage the team to a playoff berth.

I say we give it to a kitten. Kittens are the best.

Who Should win the Rookie of the Year Awards? Who Will?

LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 05:  Corey Seager #5 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts to his three run homerun for a 6-0 lead over the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fifth inning at Dodger Stadium on September 5, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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With the regular season ending on Sunday and most of the playoff spots locked up, there’s really only one big thing left to argue about: postseason awards. So let’s spend some time looking at who should win each of the four major awards and who will win them. Which are often totally different things. Next up: The Rookie of the Year Awards

This is a whole heck of a lot easier than the MVP and Cy Young Awards, that’s for sure. It’s a two horse race in the AL and a one-horse race in the NL.

Who should win the AL Rookie of the Year Award?

It seemed like Tigers starter Michael Fulmer would be the no-brainer choice for a good long while, as his low ERA and solid performance helped carry the Tigers when their starting pitching wasn’t doing them any favors. But then the Yankees called up catcher Gary Sanchez at the beginning of August and all he’s done since then is hit .303/.378/.672 with an astonishing 20 homers in his first 51 games. Fulmer has continued to be solid — he’s just short of qualifying for the ERA title, but does have the league’s lowest ERA at 3.06 — but Sanchez has been spectacular.

The MVP and Cy Young Award require full season contributions. Not everyone takes the Rookie of the Year Award quite as seriously, it seems, and are thus more willing to entertain smaller samples of excellence over large samples of solid work when it comes to the award. That’s how Bill and I think about it anyway, giving the nod to Sanchez’s historic two-month run. Ashley, however, favors Fulmer’s larger volume of work. You can’t really go wrong with either choice:

Craig: Sanchez
Bill: Sanchez
Ashley: Fulmer

Who will win the AL Rookie of the Year Award?

Hard call. I have no idea what voters will do on that quantity/quality calculation. I’ll guess Fulmer, but it’s just a guess. I could just as easily see Sanchez given some quasi-MVP credit for helping the Yankees remain relevant after the trade deadline and throw it his way.

 

Who should win the NL Rookie of the Year Award?

If you say anyone other than Corey Seager, and his .311/.369/.519 26 homer batting line, the state has authorized me to have you taken to a hospital for 48 hours of examination, at which point your competence to reenter society will be gauged. But there is ice cream there.

Craig: Seager
Bill: Seager
Ashley: Seager

 

Who will win the NL Rookie of the Year Award?

If any BBWAA voter lists anyone other than Corey Seager at the top of his or her Rookie of the Year ballot, the state has authorized me to have them taken to a hospital for 48 hours of examination, at which point their competence to reenter society will be gauged. They will not, however, be allowed to have any ice cream because, really, they should know better. They’re professionals.