Strasburg won't pitch in the majors this year

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Bob Nightengale tweets:

Strasburg, who got a $15.1 million guaranteed contract won’t make his MLB debut before 2010, Boras says. Press conference likely on Thursday

Analytical take: this is probably smart, as he pitched a lot of college innings and could use the rest, his presence won’t mean the difference between the Nats having a winning or losing season, and there’s no need for the P.R. bump of having him appear in a game because the Nats got a huge P.R. bump simply by signing him.  Heck, if he pitched once in September and got shelled, it could even be anti-P.R. Better to put his picture on the envelope of next year’s season ticket renewal letters as an unsullied and potentially-perfect product.

Cynical take: Now that the Nats know they can work with Scott Boras and live to tell the tale, there’s no WAY they want to win any more games than they have to and thus lose out on the Bryce Harper derby to Kansas City or San Diego or someone.

UPDATE: A second Nightengale tweet has Boras saying that Strasburg may not even pitch in the big leagues next year. Whatever. As of 11:58 last night, Boras doesn’t control too terribly much about Strasburg’s future, so while I agree with Boras that it may be in everyone’s best interests for Strasburg to be brought along slowly, I don’t give the Nats’ management enough credit to see beyond the increase in ticket sales that would result from him being in the Washington rotation in 2010.  Maybe in June or July 2010, but if he’s not pitching in major league games next year, I’ll eat my hat.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.