Stephen Strasburg, by the numbers

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strasburg.jpgNot sure how many people believed it would happen, but Stephen Strasburg has indeed agreed to sign with the Nationals.

While you’re contemplating how good he will be, here is a look at the numbers …

$15.1 million: The amount (not including incentives) the Nationals will pay Strasburg in his four-year contract. That’s about $5 million more than the previous record, as Mark Prior received $10.5 million in 2001.

11:58:43 p.m.: The time when the sides agreed to the deal, according to Nationals president Stan Kasten. The deadline was 12:01 a.m.

195: Number of strikeouts Strasburg compiled last season at San Diego State. They came in 109 innings, with a 1.32 ERA.

102: The number, in miles-per-hour, that Strasburg can throw his fastball. Also the number of losses the Nationals suffered in 2008.

103: The number of losses the Nats are on pace to compile in 2009. Can they get him in uniform fast enough?

2010: The year Bryce “The Chosen One” Harper goes No. 1 in the draft. Wondering if the Nats can afford both of these guys?

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If you Twitter, and you can hit 102 mph on the radar gun, feel free to follow me at @Bharks.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.