Daily Dose: Tigers get Huff from Orioles

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Detroit added Aubrey Huff to the mix Monday, sending 2008 fourth-round pick Brett Jacobson to Baltimore for the 32-year-old veteran. Huff was one of the best hitters in baseball last season, but has seen his OPS drop nearly 200 points this year while batting .253/.321/.405 in 110 games. Those numbers would be Huff’s worst since he was a rookie in 2001, so he figures to bounce back, especially versus righties.
However, finding a spot for him defensively could prove difficult for the Tigers. Huff has played only first base and designated hitter this season, was a terrible defensive third basemen even when he was playing there regularly, and hasn’t spent a single inning in the outfield since 2006. He’s not going to bump Miguel Cabrera from first base and Carlos Guillen seems entrenched at DH, so things could get tricky.
In theory he provides a backup plan at third base should Brandon Inge’s knee issues linger, but going from Inge to Huff would be a massive downgrade defensively. His best fit is probably in left field, platooning with the right-handed Marcus Thames, but the Tigers could also use Huff as a way to lessen Magglio Ordonez’s playing time as he nears the plate appearances needed to trigger next year’s $18 million option.
While the Tigers pick up a useful left-handed hitter and the Orioles get a decent relief prospect, here are some other notes from around baseball …


* Vicente Padilla signed a three-year, $33.75 million contract extension after going 15-10 with a 4.50 ERA in 200 innings spread over 33 starts in 2006, but has posted a 5.09 ERA in 70 starts since. Texas designated him for assignment last week and released him outright Monday, eating the rest of his $12 million salary for this season while dropping another $1.75 million to buy out his $12 million option for 2010.
Padilla hasn’t had an ERA below 4.50 since 2003, has dealt with several injuries that includes a recent bout with swine flu, and the Rangers’ pitching staff is significantly improved, so simply cutting him loose has little chance of keeping general manager Jon Daniels up at night. With that said, it wouldn’t be surprising to see a contender take a flier on Padilla down the stretch, because he’s still a reasonable fifth starter.
* Speaking of veteran pitchers getting released Monday, as expected the Red Sox cut John Smoltz loose. Smoltz reportedly balked at a possible move to the bullpen and the Red Sox had obviously seen enough of him as a starter after eight mostly terrible outings. He’s now free to sign anywhere and there’s speculation that at least a half-dozen teams could be vying for his services.
I’m still convinced that Smoltz can get big-league hitters out, but would certainly give him a shot in middle relief long before letting him take the mound as a starter again. He generally pitched fairly well during his first trip through the order and was pretty effective against right-handed batters, so bullpen work seems like the best remaining bet for the 42-year-old future Hall of Famer.
AL Quick Hits: No. 2 overall pick Dustin Ackley agreed to a last-minute deal with the Mariners that’s reportedly worth nearly $10 million … Meanwhile, the Rangers failed to sign first-round pick Matt Purke … Joe Mauer came up a triple short of the cycle Monday and also stole a base while boosting his batting average to .380 … Justin Morneau left Monday’s game with dizziness, either from the Texas heat or sickness from watching the Twins’ pitching staff … Vladimir Guerrero went deep twice and knocked in five runs Monday, giving him six long balls in 10 games … Matt Harrison (ribs) said Monday that “there’s a chance” he could pitch again this year … Francisco Liriano could be headed to the bullpen or the disabled list after coughing up seven runs in two innings Monday … Tigers first rounder Jacob Turner landed a big-league deal worth as much as $7 million, which is pretty amazing for a high-school pitcher.
NL Quick Hits: With just a few minutes remaining before Monday’s midnight signing deadline, No. 1 overall pick Stephen Strasburg and the Nationals agreed to a deal that will reportedly pay him over $15 million … Tommy Hanson improved to 8-2 with another solid outing Monday and has 16 strikeouts versus zero walks in his last two starts … Garrett Jones went deep again Monday, giving the career minor leaguer 13 homers in 158 at-bats … Nate McLouth (hamstring) was placed on the disabled list Monday, so the Braves will shift Ryan Church to center field with Matt Diaz manning right field … Hiroki Kuroda (concussion) will miss his next start, but hopes to avoid the DL … Max Scherzer gave up nine runs Monday, but his own error made six of them unearned … No. 3 overall pick Donavan Tate will bypass college after inking a $6.25 million deal with the Padres … Todd Wellemeyer (elbow) has been cleared to resume throwing.

Rick Ankiel drank vodka before a start to deal with the yips

9 Apr 2000: Rick Ankiel #66 of the St. Louis Cardinals winds back to pitch the ball during the game against the Milwaukee Brweers at the Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri. The Cardinals defeated the Brewers 11-2. Mandatory Credit: Elsa Hasch  /Allsport
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The story of Rick Ankiel is well known by now. He was a phenom pitcher who burst onto the scene with the Cardinals in 1999 and into the 2000 season as one of the top young talents in the game. Then, in the 2000 playoffs, he melted down. He got the yips. Whatever you want to call it, he lost the ability to throw strikes and his pitching career was soon over. He came back, however, against all odds, and remade his career as a solid outfielder.

It’s inspirational and incredible. But there is a lot more to the story that we’ve ever known. We will soon, however, as Ankiel is coming out with a book. Today he took to the airwaves and shared some about it. Including some amazing stuff:

On drinking in his first start after the famous meltdown in Game One of the 2000 National League division series against the Braves:

“Before that game…I’m scared to death. I know I have no chance. Feeling the pressure of all that, right before the game I get a bottle of vodka. I just started drinking vodka. Low and behold, it kind of tamed the monster, and I was able to do what I wanted. I’m sitting on the bench feeling crazy I have to drink vodka to pitch through this. It worked for that game. (I had never drank before a game before). It was one of those things like the yipps, the monster, the disease…it didn’t fight fair so I felt like I wasn’t going to fight fair either.”

Imagine spending your whole life getting to the pinnacle of your career. Then imagine it immediately disintegrating. And then imagine having to go out and do it again in front of millions. It’s almost impossible for anyone to contemplate and, as such, it’s hard to judge almost anything Ankiel did in response to that when he was 21 years-old. That Ankiel got through that and made a career for himself is absolutely amazing. It’s a testament to his drive and determination.

 

Justin Turner talks “Easy D”

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 22:  Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers warms up prior to game six of the National League Championship Series against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on October 22, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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A couple of weeks ago our president wrote one of his more . . . vexing tweets. He was talking about immigration when he whipped out the phrase . . . “Easy D”:

No one was quite sure what he meant by Easy D. Was it the older brother of N.W.A.’s founder? The third sequel to that Emma Stone movie from a few years back? So many questions!

Baseball Twitter had fun with it, though, with a lot of people wondering how they could work it in casually to their commentary:

It wasn’t a scout who did it, but twelve days after that, a player obliged Mr. McCullough:

I have no more idea what Turner was talking about with that than Trump was. We’ll have to wait for the full story in the L.A. Times. But I am going to assume Turner was doing McCullough a solid with that one rather than commenting on the president’s tweet. Either way, I’m glad he made the effort.

And before you ask: yes, it’s a slow news day.