Restoring the rosters: No. 22 – Detroit

Leave a comment

This is part of a series of articles examining what every team’s roster would look like if given only the players it originally signed. I’m compiling the rosters, ranking them and presenting them in a countdown from Nos. 30 to 1.
No. 30 – Cincinnati
No. 29 – Kansas City
No. 28 – San Diego
No. 27 – Milwaukee
No. 26 – Baltimore
No. 25 – Chicago (AL)
No. 24 – Chicago (NL)
No. 23 – Pittsburgh
22nd may not seem like much, but this is a big step forward from where the Tigers would have ranked a few years ago. Prior to 2005, the team had finished under .500 in 12 straight seasons. What little talent the team produced during that span mostly went to Texas in return for Juan Gonzalez in 1999.
Rotation
Justin Verlander
Jair Jurrjens
Rick Porcello
John Smoltz
Luke French
Bullpen
Francisco Cordero
Jason Frasor
Fernando Rodney
Joel Zumaya
Ryan Perry
Trever Miller
Jeff Weaver
With two top-of-the-rotation starters and three fine late-game relievers, the Tigers have more to offer in the pitching department than most of the other teams in the bottom half of the rankings. Depth is an issue, though. Porcello isn’t a legitimate No. 3 at this point, and I may be in the minority in that I’d still take Smoltz over Brian Moehler, Weaver and Andrew Miller. If Porcello develops as expected, Andrew Miller comes along and Zumaya gets healthy, this could be a legitimate top-five staff in a couple of years.
Lineup
CF Curtis Granderson
2B Omar Infante
1B Frank Catalanotto
3B Brandon Inge
RF Matt Joyce
LF Cody Ross
DH Jeff Larish
SS Ramon Santiago
C Alex Avila
Bench
OF Cameron Maybin
INF-OF Ryan Raburn
INF Anderson Hernandez
C Dusty Ryan
It’s not a lineup that’s going to scare anyone, but at least the Tigers can boast legitimate options at every position, which is an improvement over most of the teams below them. Infante, Ross, Santiago and Raburn are all underappreciated players, and Joyce and Larish still figure to produce if given the opportunity. The Tigers even have some useful players who didn’t make the team, like Clete Thomas, Jack Hannahan and Gabe Kapler.
As is, the pieces fit quite well. Lefties and righties can be alternated throughout the lineup against right-handed starters. Versus lefties, Maybin can replace Joyce, Raburn can start over Catalanotto or Larish and Ryan can alternate with Avila. Maybe no one on the team besides Granderson will boast much more than an 800 OPS, but there are no real liabilities.
Summary
The Tigers drafted about as poorly as any team in the 1990s, but things have turned around since Dave Dombrowski took over in 2002, and while no one has ever accused the Tigers farm system of being deep, it’s churned out some excellent players lately. Most of the key players above are still capable of getting better, and if I redo these rankings in a couple of years, I’ll fully expect the Tigers to crack the top 15.

Report: Teams have inquired with the Angels about Hector Santiago

ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 20:  Hector Santiago #53 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches during the first inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers  at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 20, 2016 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
1 Comment

ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reported on Monday that the Angels have received inquiries from multiple teams concerning starter Hector Santiago. He adds that the club is willing to listen to offers. Jon Morosi of FOX Sports and MLB Network reports that the Marlins are among the teams that have inquired.

Santiago, 28, has pitched to a 4.32 ERA with 96 strikeouts and 47 walks in 110 1/3 innings. Sabermetric statistics such as FIP, xFIP, and SIERA think the lefty has pitched even worse than his ERA indicates however, pitting 2016 as his worst performance to date.

Santiago is earning $5 million this season and will enter his third and final year of arbitration eligibility going into 2017.

We also learned earlier that, in an effort to bolster their starting rotation, the Marlins have also shown interest in Wade Miley of the Mariners and Jeremy Hellickson of the Phillies.

Prince Fielder will undergo season-ending neck surgery this week

SEATTLE, WA - JUNE 10: Prince Fielder #84 takes a swing during a game against the Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field on June 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. The Mariners won the game 7-5. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
5 Comments

The Rangers placed DH Prince Fielder on the disabled list last week due to more neck discomfort. On Friday, Fielder met with Dr. Drew Dossett, who performed spinal fusion surgery on Fielder in 2014 for a herniated disk in his neck. Dossett has recommended another procedure, so Fielder will undergo season-ending surgery this week, Jeff Wilson of the Fort-Worth Star Telegram reports.

Fielder was having a rough season, batting .212/.292/.334 with eight home runs and 44 RBI in 370 plate appearances. He played in only 42 games in 2014, but returned in 2015 looking more like his old self. Unfortunately, neck and back issues are notoriously difficult to fix. Hopefully, this upcoming procedure does the trick for Fielder.

Fielder is owed $24 million per season through 2020, with the Tigers paying $6 million of it per season.