Restoring the rosters: No. 23 – Pittsburgh

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This is part of a series of articles examining what every team’s roster would look like if given only the players it originally signed. I’m compiling the rosters, ranking them and presenting them in a countdown from Nos. 30 to 1.
No. 30 – Cincinnati
No. 29 – Kansas City
No. 28 – San Diego
No. 27 – Milwaukee
No. 26 – Baltimore
No. 25 – Chicago (AL)
No. 24 – Chicago (NL)
The shame of the steel city has been better at developing talent than some of the other usual cellar dwellers, not that it’s done the franchise a lot of good. As a result of the latest rebuilding effort, just six of the following 25 players remain in the organization.
Zach Duke
Chris Young
Tim Wakefield
Paul Maholm
Bronson Arroyo
Mike Gonzalez
Matt Capps
Leo Nunez
John Grabow
Ian Snell
Joe Beimel
Tom Gorzelanny
It’s ace-less pitching staff, but one that would likely be very solid. When Young or Wakefield goes down, Gorzelanny can move into the rotation and perhaps even improve it. Snell is another fallback starter, but he might be more valuable helping out in a bullpen that’s rather lefty heavy.
Left-handed relievers are what the Pirates have excelled at developing through the years. Besides Gonzalez, Grabow and Beimel, there’s also Sean Burnett and Brian Shouse who failed to make the cut. The top right-handed alternatives for the pen were Jonathan Albaladejo and Jeff Bennett.
LF Nyjer Morgan
CF Andrew McCutchen
RF Nate McLouth
3B Aramis Ramirez
C Ryan Doumit
1B Steve Pearce
2B Jeff Keppinger
SS Brent Lillibridge
OF Barry Bonds
OF Jose Bautista
OF Rajai Davis
C Ronny Paulino
INF Brian Bixler
I debated whether or not to include Bonds. He’s eligible, since he hasn’t technically retired, but I have doubts that he’d be of much use as an outfielder right now. In the end, I decided to include him as the team’s top pinch-hitter. He wasn’t seriously factored into the team’s 23rd-place ranking.
If Bonds were excluded, then Jose Guillen would have claimed the final spot. As is, I see no reason to bump anyone for Guillen.
Jason Kendall also fails to make the cut.
The young outfield is nice and there are a couple of quality power hitters in the middle of the order, but the real problem here is that the Pirates simply can’t develop middle infielders. They deserve partial credit for Jack Wilson, but he did spend two years in the St. Louis farm system. It looks like the last above average middle infielder they developed themselves was Rennie Stennett, who debuted in 1971. Keppinger gets the nod over Jose Castillo at second base here. He’s a liability against righties, but he won’t embarrass himself. Shortstop was a tossup between a pair of disappointments in Lillibridge and Bixler.
Tim Lincecum, Matt Wieters, B.J. Upton and Stephen Drew. All of them could have been Pirates. Sure, we can play that game with every team, but that the Pirates were making bad choices while picking early in so many recent drafts was obvious at the time and only became more frustrating when money the team refused to spend on a potential superstar went instead to veterans with no chance of making the team a contender.
The Pirates are well on their way to finishing below .500 for a 17th straight season, and it’s practically assured that they’ll make it an 18th in 2010. Still, they’ve utilized better strategies since bringing in Neal Huntington as their new GM. I’ve disagreed with some of the execution, but at least the team is no longer aiming for that elusive 81-win season. Better to lose 100 games now if it will help the chances of putting a real contender on the field a couple of years down the road.

Report: Yasiel Puig started a fight at a Miami nightclub

Yasiel Puig
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When last we posted about Yasiel Puig it was to pass along a rumor that the best player on his team wants him off of it. If that was true — and if this report is true — then expect that sentiment to remain unchanged:

Obviously this report is vague and there has not been, say, a police report or other details to fill it in. Perhaps we’ll learn more, perhaps Puig was misbehaving perhaps he wasn’t.

As we wait for details, however, it’s probably worth reminding ourselves that Puig is coming off of a lost season in which he couldn’t stay healthy, so trading him for any sort of decent return at the moment isn’t super likely. Which leads us to some often overlooked but undeniable baseball wisdom: you can be a distraction if you’re effective and you can be ineffective if you’re a good guy. You really can’t be an ineffective distraction, however, and expect to hang around very long.

Are the Padres adding some yellow to their color scheme for 2016?

Tony Gwynn

We’ve written several times about how boring the Padres’ uniforms and color scheme is. And how that’s an even greater shame given how colorful they used to be. No, not all of their mustard and brown ensembles were great looking, but some were and at some point it’s better to miss boldly than to endure blandness.

Now comes a hint that the Padres may step a toe back into the world of bright colors. At least a little bit. A picture of a new Padres cap is making the rounds in which a new “sunshine yellow” color has been added to the blue and white:

This story from the Union-Tribune notes that the yellow also appears on the recently-unveiled 2016 All-Star Game logo, suggesting that the yellow in the cap could either be part of some  special All-Star-related gear or a new color to the normal Padres livery.

I still strongly advocate for the Padres to bring back the brown — and there are a multitude of design ideas which could do that in tasteful fashion — but for now any addition of some color would be a good thing.

Brett Lawrie “likely to be traded” by the A’s

Brett Lawrie

Oakland’s re-acquisition of infielder Jed Lowrie from Houston makes it “likely” that the A’s will now trade infielder Brett Lawrie, according to Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle.

Slusser says Lowrie’s arrival “all but ensures” both Lawrie and Danny Valencia are on the trading block, adding that Lawrie “is considered the better bet to be traded.”

Acquired last offseason from the Blue Jays in the Josh Donaldson trade, Lawrie hit .260 with 16 homers and a .706 OPS in 149 games while playing second base and third base. At age 25 he’s a solid player, but Lawrie has failed to live up to his perceived potential while hitting .263 with a .736 OPS in 494 career games.

At this point it sounds like the A’s plan to start Marcus Semien at shortstop and Lowrie at second base.

Gammons: The Red Sox could go $30-40 million higher on David Price than anyone else


Peter Gammons reports that the Red Sox are on a mission to sign David Price and that they will pay some serious money to get him. Gammons quotes one anonymous GM who says that he expects the Sox to “go $30-40 million above anyone else.”

The man calling the shots for the Sox is Dave Dombrowski and he knows Price well, of course, having traded for him in Detroit. But there is going to be serious competition for Price’s services with the Jays and Cubs, among many others, bidding for his services. It would be unusual for a team to outbid the competition by tens of millions as Gammons’ source suggests, but the dollars will be considerable regardless.