Restoring the rosters: No. 23 – Pittsburgh

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This is part of a series of articles examining what every team’s roster would look like if given only the players it originally signed. I’m compiling the rosters, ranking them and presenting them in a countdown from Nos. 30 to 1.
No. 30 – Cincinnati
No. 29 – Kansas City
No. 28 – San Diego
No. 27 – Milwaukee
No. 26 – Baltimore
No. 25 – Chicago (AL)
No. 24 – Chicago (NL)
The shame of the steel city has been better at developing talent than some of the other usual cellar dwellers, not that it’s done the franchise a lot of good. As a result of the latest rebuilding effort, just six of the following 25 players remain in the organization.
Rotation
Zach Duke
Chris Young
Tim Wakefield
Paul Maholm
Bronson Arroyo
Bullpen
Mike Gonzalez
Matt Capps
Leo Nunez
John Grabow
Ian Snell
Joe Beimel
Tom Gorzelanny
It’s ace-less pitching staff, but one that would likely be very solid. When Young or Wakefield goes down, Gorzelanny can move into the rotation and perhaps even improve it. Snell is another fallback starter, but he might be more valuable helping out in a bullpen that’s rather lefty heavy.
Left-handed relievers are what the Pirates have excelled at developing through the years. Besides Gonzalez, Grabow and Beimel, there’s also Sean Burnett and Brian Shouse who failed to make the cut. The top right-handed alternatives for the pen were Jonathan Albaladejo and Jeff Bennett.
Lineup
LF Nyjer Morgan
CF Andrew McCutchen
RF Nate McLouth
3B Aramis Ramirez
C Ryan Doumit
1B Steve Pearce
2B Jeff Keppinger
SS Brent Lillibridge
Bench
OF Barry Bonds
OF Jose Bautista
OF Rajai Davis
C Ronny Paulino
INF Brian Bixler
I debated whether or not to include Bonds. He’s eligible, since he hasn’t technically retired, but I have doubts that he’d be of much use as an outfielder right now. In the end, I decided to include him as the team’s top pinch-hitter. He wasn’t seriously factored into the team’s 23rd-place ranking.
If Bonds were excluded, then Jose Guillen would have claimed the final spot. As is, I see no reason to bump anyone for Guillen.
Jason Kendall also fails to make the cut.
The young outfield is nice and there are a couple of quality power hitters in the middle of the order, but the real problem here is that the Pirates simply can’t develop middle infielders. They deserve partial credit for Jack Wilson, but he did spend two years in the St. Louis farm system. It looks like the last above average middle infielder they developed themselves was Rennie Stennett, who debuted in 1971. Keppinger gets the nod over Jose Castillo at second base here. He’s a liability against righties, but he won’t embarrass himself. Shortstop was a tossup between a pair of disappointments in Lillibridge and Bixler.
Summary
Tim Lincecum, Matt Wieters, B.J. Upton and Stephen Drew. All of them could have been Pirates. Sure, we can play that game with every team, but that the Pirates were making bad choices while picking early in so many recent drafts was obvious at the time and only became more frustrating when money the team refused to spend on a potential superstar went instead to veterans with no chance of making the team a contender.
The Pirates are well on their way to finishing below .500 for a 17th straight season, and it’s practically assured that they’ll make it an 18th in 2010. Still, they’ve utilized better strategies since bringing in Neal Huntington as their new GM. I’ve disagreed with some of the execution, but at least the team is no longer aiming for that elusive 81-win season. Better to lose 100 games now if it will help the chances of putting a real contender on the field a couple of years down the road.

The Cardinals lost because Trevor Rosenthal forgot to cover first base

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The Cardinals dropped Thursday afternoon’s series finale to the Mets in heartbreaking fashion. With the game tied 2-2 in the ninth inning, closer Trevor Rosenthal was trying to see his way out of a jam. The Mets had runners on the corners with two outs.

Jose Reyes swung at the first pitch he saw from Rosenthal, grounding it down the first base line. Matt Carpenter snagged the ball and it looked like it’d be an inning-ending 3-1 putout, but Rosenthal didn’t cover first base. By the time he made his way to the bag, it was too late. Yoenis Cespedes touched home and Reyes stepped on the bag safely, walking the Mets off 3-2 winners.

The Cardinals, now 46-49, have dropped both series since the All-Star break.

MLB.com’s Jenifer Langosh has post-game quotes from Rosenthal and Carpenter:

Survey says: Yankees still the most hated in baseball

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FiveThirtyEight commissioned a survey through SurveyMonkey, polling 989 self-described baseball fans about their baseball fandom. They were asked which teams were their favorites both overall and by census region, which teams they found favorable among 10 randomly assigned teams, and which teams were their least favorite.

The good news for Yankees fans: the Yankees had the highest share of respondents who selected them as their favorite team. They came in at 10 percent, followed by the Red Sox, Cubs, and Braves at eight percent. The Yankees (28 percent) and Red Sox (23 percent) also made up more than half of the favorites in the northeast census region. The Yankees were third in the south (nine percent), 10th in the midwest (three percent), and sixth in the west (six percent).

The Yankees, however, were the only team with a higher unfavorable rating than favorable. 44 percent of respondents had a favorable view of the Yankees while 48 percent were unfavorable. The Phillies were next at 33 percent favorable and 29 percent unfavorable. The Yankees’ unfavorable rating was by far the highest; the Mets came in second at 35 percent.

A whopping 27 percent of respondents selected the Yankees as their most hated team. The Red Sox came in second at 10 percent followed by the Dodgers and the Diamondbacks (what?) at five percent. The Yankees were also selected as the most hated team in all four census regions: 34 percent in the northeast, 25 percent in the south, 28 percent in the midwest, and 26 percent in the west.

There has been some thought that the Derek Jeter-less Yankees, replete with up-and-coming players like Aaron Judge, may actually be likable. But this survey shows that, at least right now, they’re still the bane of many baseball fans’ existence.