Watching the Tigers' arms

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Patrick Hayes makes a good point regarding the workloads of the Tigers’ pitchers:

[Justin Verlander, Edwin Jackson and Jarrod Washburn] are on pace to set career-highs in innings pitched and all three are pitching much longer into games than they did a season ago . . .  Jackson has never thrown 200 innings in a season (previous career-high was 181 last year) and is on pace to hit 210 this year. He’s been averaging 6.6 innings per start, up from 5.7 per appearance last season.

Verlander is throwing 6.6 innings per start as well, up slightly from his 6.1 last season. He’s on pace to throw 225 innings, up from his previous career-high of 201.

Something to watch out for, sure, and definitely the kind of thing that should inspire Jim Leyland to try and find a little rest for those guys somewhere down the stretch if at all possible.  This Tigers team reminds me a lot of the 2007 Indians, and you’ll recall that their failure to get past Boston may very well have been due to Sabathia and Carmona simply tiring out by the time the ALCS rolled around.

Still, we’re not talking crazy workloads, and those guys have been generally durable.  And as long as the White Sox lurk, it’s not like the Tigers have much of a choice but to throw them out there every fifth day. 

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.