Hot times and hot tempers … ain't it great?

Leave a comment

As we move closer to playoff stretch run territory, there seems to be an increase in intensity (some might call it testiness) in games.

In the last week, we’ve seen a heated dialogue between Dustin Pedroia and Jorge Posada after Pedroia was drilled by a pitch, Tony La Russa and Ozzie Guillen both lamenting their players being plunked, and a beanball battle that escalated into a brawl between the Red Sox and Tigers.

It all makes for some entertaining baseball, ramping up some rivalries and perhaps creating new ones.

But on Wednesday, we had a puzzling episode between the Dodgers and Giants. San Francisco’s Pablo Sandoval, while checking his swing, appeared to be grazed on the back elbow by a pitch from James McDonald. The pitch wasn’t that close to Sandoval’s torso, and wouldn’t have hit him had he not dropped his elbow. But he acted as if McDonald was head-hunting, yelling and pointing at the pitcher, starting a bench-clearing incident that resulted in, well, nothing.

The kicker? The umps ruled the pitch didn’t even hit Sandoval, and the at-bat continued awkwardly before ending in a walk.

After the game, Giants catcher Bengie Molina wrote about the game in his blog, sounding a bit puzzled by the whole thing.

Pablo thought McDonald was intentionally trying to hit him, which is a judgment call on his part. Maybe he and McDonald have a history in the minor leagues or something. I don’t know. But you always back up your teammate, no matter what.

Translation? Sandoval got a little crazy. That’ll happen in an intense series involving rivals, especially when both teams have playoff aspirations. Plus, Sandoval just turned 23 on Tuesday, so he’s young. But I’m guessing he’ll get some instruction from veteran teammates on when it’s appropriate to act out, and how to do so.

Our own Bert Blyleven, who played 22 seasons in the bigs and is 13th on the all-time hit batters list, will write about this very topic later this week. So stay tuned for that.

In the meantime, be cool people. Unless, of course, you’ve been disrespected, then you might have to throw your helmet.

Astros’ bullpen throws combined one-hitter for MLB-best 30th win

Bob Levey/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Astros’ bullpen did yeoman’s work in place of the injured Dallas Keuchel on Monday against the Tigers. Keuchel is temporarily sidelined with a pinched nerve in his neck.

Brad Peacock made the spot start, limiting the Tigers to one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over 4 1/3 innings. Chris Devenski took over with one out in the fifth, finishing out that inning as well as the sixth and seventh, facing the minimum. Will Harris pitched a perfect eighth and Ken Giles closed out the 1-0 victory in the ninth. Devenski, Harris, and Giles each had two strikeouts.

The Astros scored their only run in the bottom of the first inning as George Springer drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Jose Altuve‘s one-out double. Tigers starter Brad Fulmer pitched well enough to win on most days, giving up the lone run in seven frames.

After Monday’s win, the Astros became the first team to reach 30 wins, sitting on a 30-15 record. With a +55 run differential, even their expected record matches up with their actual record.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

Justin K. Aller/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.