Jamie Moyer = Grumpy Old Man

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So Jamie Moyer feels “misled” by the Philadelphia Phillies, and “disheartened” by his demotion to the bullpen, a result of his own pitching struggles and the arrival of Pedro Martinez.

As I am approaching middle age, I can relate a little bit to what Moyer is going through. When you get older, you tend to forget things, such as:

Your last start: 5 innings, 11 hits, and miraculously only 2 runs allowed.
Your season pitching line: 10-9 with a 5.47 ERA, 1.508 WHIP.
Where you left your car keys: In the basket by the phone, dummy.

Most importantly, you forget that your employer was kind (or dumb) enough to lavish a 2-year, $13 million contract on a guy who had just turned 46. Was anyone else out there dangling a two-year deal? Didn’t think so. Heck, Bobby Abreu couldn’t even get a two-year contract to his liking.

Odds are that Martinez won’t be much better than Moyer. Perhaps, even worse. A flip-flopping of roles for Moyer and Martinez isn’t out of the question. But until then, it’s best to suck it up and zip your lip for the good of the team.

If there is one thing I’ve learned from those older than me, it’s that life isn’t always fair.


If you Twitter, and are a fan of grumpy old people like Jamie Moyer and Dana Carvey, you can follow me at @bharks.

Chris Sale will start on Opening Day for Red Sox

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No surprise here: Chris Sale will start on Opening Day for the Red Sox, Pete Abraham of The Boston Globe reports. The Red Sox open the season on March 29 in Tampa Bay against the Rays. Sale will oppose Chris Archer.

Sale, 28, is the fifth different Opening Day starter the Red Sox have had in as many years, preceded by Rick Porcello, David Price, Clay Buchholz, and Jon Lester. Sale started on Opening Day for the White Sox in 2013, ’14, and ’16.

Sale finished second in AL Cy Young Award balloting last year and finished ninth for AL MVP. He went 17-8 with a 2.90 ERA and a 308/43 K/BB ratio in 214 1/3 innings. Sale and Clayton Kershaw (2015) are the only pitchers to strike out 300 or more batters in a season dating back to 2003.