Golden Baseball League stats

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Aaron’s mention of Scott Spiezio signing to play in the Golden Baseball League got me curious, so here’s a look at the stats of the notable and semi-notable players participating in the league this year.
Walter Young – .329/.394/.482, 3 HR, 8 RBI, 15/5 K/BB, 0 SB in 85 AB
Hulking first baseman got a brief look with the Orioles in 2005, hitting .303/.378/.424 in 33 at-bats, but the team was never interested in giving him a real shot when they could go with over-the-hill players like Sammy Sosa, Rafael Palmeiro, Kevin Millar and Jeff Conine. He’s been drifting between indy leagues since 2007.
Kris Honel – 4-4, 4.30 ERA, 36 H, 45/43 K/BB in 46 IP
Honel, the 16th overall pick in the 2001 draft, was regarded as one of baseball’s top pitching prospects before blowing wrecking his arm in 2004. After Tommy John surgery at the end of 2005, he returned with decent stuff and no command in 2007. The numbers suggest that nothing has changed since.
Joey Gomes – .305/.343/.547, 10 HR, 43 RBI, 28/13 K/BB, 2 SB in 190 AB
Jonny’s older brother typically put up solid numbers, but never made it higher than Double-A after the Rays drafted him in the eighth round in 2002.
Jo Matumoto – 4-5, 4.62 ERA, 91 H, 74/25 K/BB in 78 IP
It was something of a big deal when the Jays signed Matumoto, the then 36-year-old ace of Brazil’s national team, in 2007, but mid-3.00 ERAs in both Double- and Triple-A weren’t enough to get him a look during his two years in the organization.
Jose Lima – 5-5, 2.93 ERA, 84 H, 51/10 K/BB in 83 IP
Lima will never see the majors again, but he can still get it done against lesser hitters.
Hideki Irabu – 5-3, 3.58 ERA, 62 H, 66/19 K/BB in 65 1/3 IP
Irabu was using the Golden League as a springboard for a comeback in Japan. He recently returned to his native land, though he’s pitching in a minor league at the moment.
Sergio Pedroza – .330/.443/.583, 14 HR, 60 RBI, 54/44 K/BB, 10 SB in 230 AB
It seems the scouts were right about Pedroza, who tore up A-ball pitching but flopped in Double-A last year. The 2005 third-round pick still has a career OPS of 883 in four minor league seasons, but it appears that he didn’t get any offers he liked after being let go by the Rays after last season.
Josh Karp – 0-1, 19.29 ERA, 20 H, 5/2 K/BB in 7 IP
Karp’s stay was a short one. The sixth overall pick in the 2001 draft hadn’t played in the minors since 2005 before staging his brief comeback.
Alexis Gomez – .340/.419/.698, 6 HR, 20 RBI, 8/8 K/BB, 8 SB in 53 AB
In his last major league action, Gomez hit .272/.318/.388 in 103 at-bats for the Tigers in 2006. He is still a pretty good Triple-A regular, so he’s rather overqualified for the Golden League.
Damian Jackson – .363/.412/.514, 4 HR, 28 RBI, 28/21 K/BB in 212 AB
Jackson’s 11-season major league career came to an end when he hit .198/.295/.371 for the Nationals in 2006. That said, he still might be a better player than most of the shortstops the Royals have trotted out in the three years since.
Robert Fick – .323/.378/.513, 5 HR, 38 RBI, 24/15 K/BB, 0 SB in 158 AB
Like Jackson, Fick is a former Padre playing for Phil Nevin on the Orange County squad. He last played in the majors with the Nationals in 2007.
Jonathan Rouwenhorst – 0-1, 2.13 ERA, 26 H, 23/7 K/BB in 25 1/3 IP
Rouwenhorst possesses one of my favorite deliveries in baseball, but after experiencing a great deal of success at lower levels, he stalled out in Triple-A and failed to reach the majors with the Angels or Braves.
Dustin Yount – .297/.380/.462, 7 HR, 39 RBI, 32/28 K/BB in 212 AB
Robin’s son was the Orioles’ ninth-round pick in 2001. He topped out in Double-A in 2006 and was released after hitting .228/.323/.347 in 167 at-bats at the level.
Emiliano Fruto – 0-2, 3.96 ERA, 22 H, 39/11 K/BB in 25 IP
Maybe the most talented hurler in the league, Fruto had a 4.36 ERA and a 549/299 K/BB ratio in 566 1/3 innings as a major leaguer. Last year, he fanned 102 and walked 59 in 89 innings for Triple-A Tucson. He’s still just 25 now, so odds are that he’ll return to affiliated ball at some point.
Other notables
Manny Ayala – 2-3, 8.23 ERA, 40 H, 12/20 K/BB in 27 1/3 IP
Lorenzo Barcelo – 6-5, 5.13 ERA, 97 H, 75/5 K/BB in 79 IP
Eude Brito – 3-0, 3.48 ERA, 34 H, 22/8 K/BB in 31 IP
Matt Durkin – 8-3, 3.77 ERA, 81 H, 34/46 K/BB in 83 2/3 IP
Bartolome Fortunato – 2-1, 2.63 ERA, 18 H, 33/6 K/BB in 24 IP
Mac Suzuki – 4-3, 5 Sv, 2.35 ERA, 31 H, 59/8 K/BB in 38 1/3 IP
Wayne Franklin – 1-2, 3.38 ERA, 38 H, 21/23 K/BB in 40 IP
Ismael Castro – .316/.330/.449, 4 HR, 34 RBI, 21/5 K/BB, 7 SB in 225 AB
Ben Johnson – .545/.583/1.091, 0 HR, 2 RBI, 3/1 K/BB, 0 SB in 11 AB
Angel Sanchez – .266/.412/.525, 11 HR, 33 RBI, 46/37 K/BB, 3 SB in 177 AB
Juan Senreiso – .284/.386/.403, 3 HR, 23 RBI, 21/20 K/BB, 11 SB in 134 AB
Junior Spivey – .326/.436/.478, 1 HR, 10 RBI, 7/9 K/BB, 0 SB in 46 AB
Ruddy Yan – .362/.438/.402, 0 HR, 30 RBI, 22/28 K/BB, 22 SB in 199 AB

Miguel Montero throws Jake Arrieta under the bus after the Nats steal seven bases

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It takes a lot of things to happen for a runner to steal a base. He has to be fast. He has to get a good jump on the pitcher. He has to beat the catcher’s throw down to second and he has to avoid a tag if it’s close.

In light of that, any number of people can, theoretically anyway, be responsible for an opposing base runner stealing a base. The pitcher can be responsible for not holding the runner or for being slow in his delivery to the plate. The catcher can be responsible for getting off bad throws to second. The middle infielder can handle the throw poorly or apply the tag poorly. Or, in some cases, the defense may do everything right and still not nab that runner because he was just too dang fast.

Last night the Washington Nationals stole seven bases off of the Chicago Cubs. Trea Turner, one of baseball’s fastest players and best base stealers, stole four of them. The pitcher on the mound for all seven of them was Jake Arrieta. The catcher behind the plate for all seven of them was Miguel Montero. The infielders for all seven of them were Tommy La Stella and Javier Baez. All of these men, Turner, and his teammates Anthony Rendon and Michael Taylor, who also stole bases, were the moving parts in play.

Who was to credit and who was to blame for all of those stolen bases? If you ask Miguel Montero, it was his pitcher, Arrieta:

 

If you can’t watch the video, here’s what he said:

“The reason why they were running left and right today because they know he was slow to the plate. It really sucked because the stolen bases go to me, and when you really look at it, the pitcher doesn’t give me any time.”

You can watch all seven of the stolen bases here. Turner gets great jumps and that can partially be blamed on Arrieta. That’s especially true on a couple of steals that didn’t even draw a throw from Montero. But:

  • On one of them Montero bounced his throw;
  • On another it was a delayed steal that seemed to take Montero by surprise;
  • On a third the pitch was high and outside, making it hard for Montero to get rid of the ball quickly but not attributable to Arrieta being deliberate;
  • One came with a runner on third, which caused Montero to, wisely, hold on to the ball to prevent a run from scoring; and
  • On the last one Montero airmailed the throw.

Perhaps someone with a stopwatch on Arrieta could better proportion blame here, but by my estimation Arrieta was clearly to blame for two of them, Montero was more at fault on three of them and the other two were really no one’s fault but circumstance. And that’s without giving Turner, Rendon and Taylor credit, which is just dumb.

But sure, Miguel, go ahead and throw this all on your team’s ace. That’s a fantastic thing for a backup catcher to do. Leads to great job security.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Nationals 6, Cubs 1: Max Scherzer allowed one run over six innings, striking out six. Four of the Nats runs came via a couple of infield singles and a couple of Cubs throwing errors. The other two came via a Michael Taylor RBI double. The Nationals stole seven bases off of Miguel Montero and Jake Arrieta, four coming from Trea Turner. After the game, Montero wanted everyone to know that it wasn’t his fault, it was Arrieta’s:

“The reason why they were running left and right today because they know he was slow to the plate,” a visibly frustrated Montero said. “It really sucked because the stolen bases go to me, and when you really look at it, the pitcher doesn’t give me any time.”

Team. Player. Joe Maddon, any comment?

Rangers 2, Indians 1: Adrian Beltre hit his 450th homer. And he did it at a wonderful time: in the ninth inning of a tie game, giving his team the win. The homer was his 2,969th career hit. Which is nice.

Orioles 3, Blue Jays 1: Kevin Gausman and three relievers held the Jays to a lone run. Which, once you adjust for this being the Orioles, is the equivalent of any other team holding the opposition to, like, negative eight runs. Mark Trumbo doubled in two, Adam Jones singled in one. A ninth inning solo homer from Troy Tulowitzki was the only damage the Jays did all night.

Tigers 5, Royals 3: Miguel Cabrera and J.D. Martinez each homered, helping the Tigers overcome an early 3-0 deficit. Justin Verlander allowed three over seven and the bullpen tossed two shutout innings. Which, once you adjust for this being the Tigers, is the equivalent of any other team’s bullpen shutting out the opposition for, like, eleven innings.

Phillies 8, Mariners 2: Maikel Franco and Arron Altherr homered for the Phillies, who overcame a 2-0 deficit. Which, once you adjust for this being the Phillies, is the equivalent of any other team overcoming, like, a six-run deficit. Aaron Nola allowed two runs over seven and struck out nine.

Red Sox 9, Twins 2: Most pitchers will not come back after a rain delay of more than an hour or so. Here Drew Pomeranz waited out a 76-minute rain delay in the second inning and stayed in the game to deliver five solid innings, backed by homers from Christian Vázquez and Chris Young In his last seven starts, Pomeranz is 4-1 with a 2.70 ERA, 44 strikeouts and 9 walks in 40 innings. The Red Sox reclaime sole possession of first place in the AL East.

Rays 4, Pirates 2: avid Freese misplayed a groundball at third base in the top of the 10th inning, allowing Steven Souza to score and giving the Rays the win. An Adeiny Hechavarria sac fly added an insurance run. Hechavarria also singled in a run in the eighth. Not a bad first day on the job for the newest Ray.

Reds 8, Brewers 6: The Redlegs were homer happy with Joey Votto hitting a tiebreaking two-run homer in the fifth and Billy Hamilton, Adam Duvall and Eugenio Suarez all going deep as well. Travis Shaw hit a three-run shot in a losing cause. The Brewers have lost three of four but continue to hold a one-game lead in the NL Central.

Marlins 6, Mets 3: Mets starter Robert Gsellman left the game after straining his hamstring while trying to beat out a grounder in the fourth inning and will now likely be the sixth Mets starter to hit the DL this year. DH uber alles. He also allowed three runs in three innings, but the Mets came back to tie it with a Travis d’Arnaud homer in the seventh. A pinch-hitting Ichiro singled in J.T. Realmuto in the bottom half of the seventh, however, and Christian Yelich singled in two more in later that inning to pad the Marlins’ lead.

White Sox 4, Yankees 3: The Yankees’ bullpen imploded once again. Leading 3-1 in the eighth, Domingo German and Tyler Clippard combined to issue four walks to allow the White Sox to get within one. In the ninth, Dellin Betances walked two guys and hit a batter before Jose Abreu smacked a walkoff single. Abreu also had an RBI double in the third. The White Sox snap a four-game losing streak.

Athletics 6, Astros 4: Ryon Healy hit a a grand slam in the sixth and Khris Davis scored one run and doubled in another. Sean Manaea was solid into the sixth, holding the mighty Astros lineup to one run. That grand slam gave the A’s needed room to absorb George Springer‘s ninth inning three-run shot.

Diamondbacks 6, Cardinals 5: The Cardinals bullpen blew this one. Leading 5-2 in the eighth, Trevor Rosenthal surrendered an RBI single to Daniel Descalso and a sac fly to Chris Herrmann to allow the Dbacks to get within one. In the ninth, Seung-Hwan Oh gave up a solo homer to David Peralta to force extras. Herrmann struck again in the tent, knocking in Reymond Fuentes with a game-ending RBI single off of Matt Bowman.

Dodgers 4, Angels 0: Kenta Maeda tossed seven shutout innings and the Dodgers scored all four of their runs in the six via a Cody Bellinger RBI single and a Joc Pederson three-run blast. This one was over in a crisp two-hours, thirty minutes. Some kook wrote a column the other day in the Wall Street Journal saying weeknight baseball games should be seven innings. If that was the case here fans could’ve kept their engines running while they watched the game and popped right back out.

Braves 3, Padres 0: Rookie Sean Newcomb shut out the Padres for six innings, striking out eight, to pick up his first career win. He’s only allowed four earned runs in 24.1 innings over four starts, so he probably deserves to have more than the one win. Padres manager Andy Green thinks Newcomb maybe didn’t deserve his eight strikeouts here:

“That was the largest strike zone I have seen against our guys behind home plate. Newcomb threw the ball very well. But Tyler Flowers is the player of the game in my mind. He is snatching balls above the zone, below the zone, and bringing them back in and getting a strike on all of them.”

Miguel Montero agrees, it was someone else’s fault. Atlanta has won eight of ten.

Giants 4, Rockies 3: This one went late but Denard Span finally sent everyone home with a walkoff RBI single in the bottom of the fourteenth inning to give the Giants the win. Kelby Tomlinson forced extras with an RBI single in the eighth inning. The Rockies are reeling, losers of seven straight. They were in first place entering play a week ago today. Now they’re in third, five and a half back of the Dodgers. So much for that early season feel good story.