Daily Dose: Waiver claim nets ChiSox Rios

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Alex Rios signed a seven-year, $70 million extension with the Blue Jays just 13 months ago, but on Monday afternoon general manager J.P. Ricciardi decided to simply dump the remainder of that contract on the White Sox when they put in a waiver claim for the 28-year-old. “This allows us to get out from under a contract and enables us to do more to address our club going forward,” Ricciardi said.
Rios is a career .285/.335/.451 hitter who’s at just .264/.317/.427 this year, so it’s tough to blame Ricciardi for not wanting to pay him an average of $12 million per season through 2014. However, Rios’ great glove and baserunning mean that his value goes far beyond production at the plate and if he returns to pre-2009 levels the White Sox will gladly pay that to replace impending free agent Jermaine Dye.
For now though Dye remains the starting right fielder and Carlos Quentin is fixed in left field, so most of Rios’ playing time figures to come at the expense of Scott Podsednik in center field. Calling the White Sox’s power-boosting ballpark home gives Rios a much improved chance of finally cracking 25 homers at some point, but in the short term a crowded outfield could take a chunk out of his value.
While the Blue Jays shed payroll and the White Sox add an underrated outfielder in his prime, here are some other notes from around baseball …


* Just when an eight-game winning streak finally had the Nationals headed in the right direction, the team received bad news during Monday’s off day. Dr. James Andrews has recommended Tommy John elbow surgery for Jordan Zimmermann after reviewing his MRI exam. Zimmermann may seek a second opinion, but the 23-year-old right-hander is done for the season and figures to go under the knife.
Zimmermann looked extremely promising before suffering the injury around three weeks ago, posting a 4.63 ERA and 92/29 K/BB ratio in 91.1 innings spread over 16 starts after basically skipping Triple-A. With a bit more seasoning and a better defense behind him Zimmermann looked like a possible ace and he may still get there, but it likely won’t be until at least 2011.
* Chris Young certainly earned a demotion to Triple-A by hitting .194/.297/.359 in 103 games, but it was still surprising to see the Diamondbacks actually make the move Monday. His sub-.200 batting average shouldn’t shock anyone after Young hit .237 as a rookie and .248 last season, but just seven homers in 315 at-bats stands out after he showed about twice that much power coming into the year.
Young will likely be back once rosters expand in September and remains part of the long-term plans, so he may be a bargain in NL-only leagues next year. In the meantime Arizona added Rusty Ryal to play some second base, Ryan Roberts is likely to see time in left field along with Trent Oeltjen, and Gerardo Parra is the everyday center fielder. Ryal has a cool name and 20-homer pop, but little else.
* Pedro Martinez will join the Phillies’ rotation Wednesday against the Cubs, with Charlie Manuel announcing that Jamie Moyer and his 5.47 ERA will be moved to the bullpen. Previously the Phillies said that Moyer wasn’t a relief option, but J.A. Happ has simply been too good to pull from the rotation and Martinez striking out 11 in his third rehab start apparently convinced the team that he’s an upgrade.
AL Quick Hits: Justin Duchscherer (elbow) had an encouraging first rehab outing Sunday at Triple-A, throwing 55 pitches … Jacoby Ellsbury topped last season’s total with his 51st stolen base of the year Monday … Torii Hunter (groin) is set to begin a rehab assignment Tuesday at Single-A … Gil Meche (back) is scheduled to come off the disabled list Thursday against the Twins … Magglio Ordonez had three extra-base hits Monday and is batting over .400 this month … Joe Maddon speculated Monday that Troy Percival will retire rather than come back from his latest injuries … Tim Wakefield (calf) tossed a simulated game Monday, but had to take three rests during the 51 pitches … Edwin Jackson needed 104 pitches to complete four innings Monday versus the Red Sox, allowing four runs … Mark Grudzielanek was released by Minnesota after the 39-year-old veteran struggled in eight games at Double-A.
NL Quick Hits: Johnny Cueto left Monday’s start after suffering a hip flexor hitting in the third inning … Billy Wagner (elbow) threw his fifth straight scoreless inning while rehabbing Monday at Single-A … Chad Billingsley (hamstring) is unlikely to make his scheduled start Wednesday … Leo Nunez notched his 12th save after Matt Lindstrom struggled with a five-run lead Monday … Aaron Cook (toe) is now on track to start Friday against the Marlins … Tom Gorzelanny headed for X-rays after being hit on the foot Monday, but gave up six runs in 1.1 innings first … Tim Hudson (elbow) is slated to begin a rehab stint Thursday at Triple-A … Bronson Arroyo and Aaron Harang have both cleared waivers … Former second overall pick Greg Reynolds has been shut down with shoulder problems that surfaced in April … LaTroy Hawkins (shingles) reported no issues after Monday’s simulated game … Troy Tulowitzki had a monster game Monday, hitting for the cycle while knocking in seven runs, and is slugging over .600 since June 1.

Jorge Posada highlights 16 one-and-done players on Hall of Fame ballot

NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 24:  Jorge Posada addresses the media during a press conference to announces his retirement from the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium on January 24, 2012 in the Bronx borough of  New York City.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
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Former Yankees catcher Jorge Posada received only 17 total votes (3.8 percent) on the 2017 Hall of Fame ballot. Unfortunately, he is one of 16 players who fell short of the five percent vote threshold and is no longer eligible on the ballot. The other players are Magglio Ordonez (three votes, 0.7 percent), Edgar Renteria (two, 0.5 percent), Jason Varitek (two, 0.5 percent), Tim Wakefield (one, 0.2 percent), Casey Blake (zero), Pat Burrell (zero), Orlando Cabrera (zero), Mike Cameron (zero), J.D. Drew (zero), Carlos Guillen (zero), Derrek Lee (zero), Melvin Mora (zero), Arthur Rhodes (zero), Freddy Sanchez (zero), and Matt Stairs (zero).

Posada, 45, helped the Yankees win four World Series championships from 1998-2000 as well as 2009. He made the American League All-Star team five times, won five Silver Sluggers, and had a top-three AL MVP Award finish. Posada also hit 20 or more homers in eight seasons, finished with a career adjusted OPS (a.k.a. OPS+) of 121, and accrued 42.7 Wins Above Replacement in his 17-year career according to Baseball Reference.

While Posada’s OPS+ and WAR are lacking compared to other Hall of Famers — he was 18th of 34 eligible players in JAWS, Jay Jaffe’s WAR-based Hall of Fame metric — catchers simply have not put up the same kind of numbers that players at other positions have. That’s likely because catching is such a physically demanding position and often results in injuries and shortened careers. It is, perhaps, not an adjustment voters have thought to make when considering Posada’s eligibility.

Furthermore, Posada’s quick ouster is somewhat due to the crowded ballot. Most voters had a hard time figuring out which 10 players to vote for. Had Posada been on the ballot in a different era, writers likely would have found it easier to justify voting for him.

Posada joins Kenny Lofton in the “unjustly one-and-done” group.

Tim Raines, Jeff Bagwell, Ivan Rodriguez Elected to the Hall of Fame

1990:  Outfielder Tim Raines of the Montreal Expos in action. Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule  /Allsport
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The 2017 induction class of the Baseball Hall of Fame was announced Wednesday evening and we have three inductees: Tim Raines, Jeff Bagwell and Ivan Rodriguez. Raines and Bagwell had to wait a good long while to get the call. Rodriguez is in on his first year of eligibility. But nowhere on the plaque will it say how long it took. All that matters now is that three of the greatest players of their respective generations finally have a place in Cooperstown.

Players must be named on 75% of the Baseball Writers Association of America’s ballots to get in. Raines was named on 86% of the ballots. Bagwell was named on 86.2%. Rodriguez was named on 76%. Non-inductees with significant vote totals include Trevor Hoffman at 74% and Vladimir Guerrero at  71.7%. The full results can be seen here.

Others not making the cut but still alive for next year, with vote totals in parenthesis: Edgar Martinez (58.6); Roger Clemens (54.1); Barry Bonds (53.8); Mike Mussina (51.8); Curt Schilling (45.0); Manny Ramirez (23.8); Larry Walker (21.9); Fred McGriff (21.7); Jeff Kent (16.7); Gary Sheffield (13.3%); Billy Wagner (10.2); and Sammy Sosa (8.6). Making his final appearance on the ballot was Lee Smith, who received 34.2% of the vote in his last year of eligibility. He will now be the business of the Veterans Committee.

Players who fell off the ballot due to not having the requisite 5% to stay on: Jorge Posada; Magglio Ordoñez; Edgar Renteria; Jason Varitek; Tim Wakefield; Casey Blake; Pat Burrell; Orlando Cabrera; Mike Cameron; J.D. Drew; Carlos Guillen; Derrek Lee; Melvin Mora; Arthur Rhodes; Freddy Sanchez; and Matt Stairs

We’ll have continued updates on today’s Hall of Fame vote throughout the evening and in the coming days. In the meantime, congratulations to this year’s inductees, Tim Raines, Jeff Bagwell and Ivan Rodriguez!