Pirates shed payroll, re-invest in draft picks

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Much was made of the Pirates dumping a bunch of salary at the trading deadline, as they parted with relatively high-priced veterans Freddy Sanchez, Jack Wilson, John Grabow, and Adam LaRoche after previously dealing away Nate McLouth and Eric Hinske. Together those moves saved the team $7.3 million from the Opening Day payroll of $55 million, which didn’t sit well with some fans.
Pirates president Frank Coonelly even felt the need to defend the organization by explaining that “the savings are not nearly as large as some believe.” By itself slashing payroll is something that fans should absolutely question, particularly when the team involved is in the midst of a 17th straight losing season and has a nine-year-old ballpark that in theory was created to help support larger salaries. However, in this case the Pirates turned the money saved by dealing veterans into bonuses for hard-to-sign draft picks.
After paying the MLB-recommended slot price of $2.5 million for No. 4 overall pick Tony Sanchez, the Prices went significantly over slot to sign sixth-round pick Zach Von Rosenberg for $1.2 million and eighth-round pick Colton Cain for $1.1 million. In all they handed out $3.4 million to four high-school pitchers who dropped to them because of concerns about their bonus demands and ended up spending a grand total of $8 million on this year’s draft class.
Obviously only time will tell whether those above-slot signings will pay off, but investing $8 million in a bunch of high-upside prospects has a much higher likelihood of turning the Pirates into a long-term winning team than spending the same money on guys like Sanchez, LaRoche, Wilson, and Grabow. If the goal is to build a consistent winner rather than simply snapping the streak of losing seasons, Pirates management made the right call.

Clayton Kershaw could return on September 1

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Dodgers starter Clayton Kershaw has been out since July 24 with a lower back strain. He’s slated to throw a three-inning simulated game in Pittsburgh on Monday, per Bill Plunkett of the Orange County Register. Plunkett adds that if all goes well, the earliest Kershaw could return is August 31 against the Diamondbacks, but September 1 is more likely against the Padres.

Kershaw, 29, hit the disabled list on a pace to win his fourth Cy Young Award. He’s 15-2 with a 2.04 ERA and a 168/24 K/BB ratio in 141 1/3 innings.

The Dodgers have managed just fine without Kershaw. The club is 19-4 since July 24. At 87-35, the Dodgers own baseball’s best record, well ahead of the second-best Astros at 76-48.

Ian Kinsler was fined for ripping umpires publicly. Brad Ausmus says it’s the largest fine he’s seen in 25 years.

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Last week, Tigers second baseman Ian Kinsler was ejected from a game against the Rangers after giving home plate umpire Angel Hernandez a look after a pitch was thrown outside for a ball. Kinsler was apparently unhappy with calls Hernandez had made earlier. Manager Brad Ausmus, too, was ejected.

After the game, Kinsler said that Hernandez “needs to find another job.” He added, “…he needs to stop ruining baseball games.”

Kinsler was fined by Major League Baseball for his remarks, Mlive’s Evan Woodbery reports. According to Ausmus, the fine levied on Kinsler was the largest one he’s seen in nearly 25 years in baseball. Kinsler said, “I said what I felt and what I thought. If they take offense to that, then that’s their problem.” Ausmus said, “To single out one player as a union is completely uncalled for.”

As Ashley noted on Saturday, the umpires wore white wristbands to protest “escalating attacks on umpires.” The umpires agreed to drop their protest on Sunday after commissioner Rob Manfred agreed to meet with the umpire union’s governing board, Gabe Lacques of USA TODAY Sports reports.